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MODS!!! Lets see em!!

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  • #57954
    NotSharpEnuff
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    • Topics: 3
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    Billabong,

    Here’s the link.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/catalog/60205K81

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    #57956
    billabong
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    • Replies: 10

    Thanks Tom, greatly appreciate your input here and love reading your posts throughout the forum.

    Rod-end couplings are available at my local farmer’s outlet for about $8US.

    I have no problem finding Heim joints with a straight through 1/4″ hole, what I’m trying to establish is, can I avoid simply using epoxy to attach the threaded rod and replace that connection with a longer “press-in” stud? Like the original Clay supplied (in my upgrade kit) but longer, it is 1/4″ on one side (threaded) and larger on the outside end and tapered. I’m guessing Clay probably wouldn’t offer these Micro Adjuster Kits himself for that reason? Of course I may be wrong.

    It’s the ball joints that Clay supplies that I can’t find on the internet. (see pics) This mainly applies to my situation using the WE130UP3 and “L” brackets, which are machined to be a perfect and close fit together. Of course I could buy the WEUP4 set and press the stud out, but I don’t need or want to pay for the extra alterations cost of adding a broached hole in the end and including nuts.

    I can see that I will most likely fail in my quest to “press in” a longer threaded 1/4″ stud and adopt the epoxy solution like everyone else.

    It’s my OCD guiding me here!

     

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    #57959
    billabong
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    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 10

    Billabong, Here’s the link.

    Thanks Ed, I didn’t realize that you remove the 1/2″ excess metal to obtain a thin adjusting nut, so nothing in stainless out there? I see why plastic is a better option for you.

    Greatly appreciate you sharing the information, if I were in the US, I would simply order from you as freight is through the roof here now.

    Not sure if I can find these parts in Oz and if McMaster Carr post to here. A bit more research needed I think.

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    #57961
    tcmeyer
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    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 2070

    Billabong:  My question to you is what possible advantage to you see in a press-fit threaded stud as opposed to a dab of epoxy?  Wicked Edge either buys their rod-end couplings with a special stud mounted by the manufacturer or they very precisely fabricate studs of their own design.  Try to fabricate your own press-fit version and take the risk of a too-tight fit expanding the spherical ball and increasing its friction within the coupling.   A too-loose fit is likely to slip out of position.

    Where do you see a disadvantage in using threaded rod and epoxy??  There is zero negative consequence in missing the exact center axis of the  coupling, nor is there a negative consequence in missing perfect angular alignment with the axis of the spherical ball’s bore.  The only possible thing you could screw up is the mix ratio of hardener to resin.  Even then, the highest possible forces applied to the joint by pressures on the rod, simply aren’t going to result in failure.  And you want to pursue some mythical perfection?  I don’t understand.

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    #57962
    billabong
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    Wicked Edge either buys their rod-end couplings with a special stud mounted by the manufacturer or they very precisely fabricate studs of their own design. Try to fabricate your own press-fit version and take the risk of a too-tight fit expanding the spherical ball and increasing its friction within the coupling. A too-loose fit is likely to slip out of position.

    Which is why I would start with a current Wicked Edge ball joint, because the mini “L” bracket is machined to fit it perfectly and have it replaced by a machine shop using the old stud for precise dimensions. Not like I’m talking hitting it in with a hammer after angle grinding a bolt down or something. A walk in the park for the right person with the right tools.

    You seem to be offended that I doubt epoxy is a  good working solution, that’s not the case, it’s most likely what I will do. I’m thinking like a product manufacturer, would I glue it in if a press fit tapered stud was an option?

    I would be very surprised if WE have a stud of this length made deliberately. History shows the past and present methods of locking the stud after adjustment have been hamstrung by the length. I guess we may never know?

    Call me a dreamer!

    Everyone likes good engineering.

     

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