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Pitted edge on kitchen knife

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  • #53776
    Michael Blakley
    Participant
    • Topics: 26
    • Replies: 24

    My son’s mother-in-law asked me to sharpen a knife for her.

    It’s a knife that I’d say look like a long paring knife with a rounded tip.  The knife’s edge is really pitted and chunks are missing.  My guess is that the knife has been put in a dishwasher many times.

    So to sharpen this knife and put a good edge on it, I’ll need to remove a lot of metal to get down to a place beyond the pits and chunks.

    Is there a preferred method to doing this?

    Thanks!

    Michael

    #53777
    NorCalQ
    Participant
    • Topics: 44
    • Replies: 122

    Gee…this is perfect for a Tormek, which is why I kept mine.  Every time I have to change an edge angle, the Tormek is pretty accurate when set up properly and gives a good, new starting point.  Short of that, I know others will chime in.

    #53778
    Michael Blakley
    Participant
    • Topics: 26
    • Replies: 24

    NorCal, which Tormek are you referring to, there seem to be numerous Tormek products.

    Michael

    #53779
    NorCalQ
    Participant
    • Topics: 44
    • Replies: 122

    I’ve got an old version of the T8 that I got years ago and am still using.  I’ve updated some of the features, but keep meaning to update more when I have the chance.  You can do all the bells and whistles as far as wheels go, but I find the basic wheels are plenty, especially if you have a WE.  I tried and tried to get the same results with the Tormek that I do with the WE, but never could get the real consistent edges that you get with WE.  For establishing new angles, it really is easy, as long as your technique is good and your Tormek is set up properly.

    #53780
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2041

    Michael, a file made to use on metals, like many of us already have in our tool boxes is a simple, easy,  fast and inexpensive way to remove damaged steel from an old knife edge.  I use the file length wise or longitudinally down along the clamped knife’s edge.  Exercise care, use safe practice with the file.  The file allows you to save the wear and tear on your Wicked Edge diamond stones, for sharpening, while removing the damaged steel well, fairly easily and fairly quickly.  Once the pitted, worn and damage steel is removed, simply profile the bevel and sharpen as usual with your Wicked Edge.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #53781
    airscapes
    Participant
    • Topics: 13
    • Replies: 231

    I had a bunch of knives like this and was inspired to build a variable speed belt sander with horizontal chuck for buffing wheel, wire wheel or whatever you can put in a 1/2 drill chuck.  I use this for so many non knife sharpening things I don’t know what  I did with out it.. Reprofiles knives very nicely as well

     

    https://knife.wickededgeusa.com/forums/reply/52794/

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #53782
    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 7
    • Replies: 125

    I contemplated buying a Tormek T8 for a good long time but honestly, I couldn’t see myself spending that kind of money when my WE 130 serves my needs above and beyond my expectations. Not being as technically gifted as airscapes, I resorted to the metal file that MarcH  mentioned and it worked very well but then I decided to buy the 50/80 grit stones and they make quick job of re-profiling a blade. I also remembered that several years ago I bought a Ken Onion Work Sharp that I never took out of its box and was “lost” during the move to the new house. It took a lengthy search but found the thing and I bought the tool sharpening attachment for it (1 x 18 inch belt) but have yet to try it. What I’m getting at is that if you have only one badly damaged knife, the file will work and the 50/80 grit stones will complement it. If you anticipate several damaged knifes, then the better alternative could be the Ken Onion contraption but it will set you back a couple of hundreds. If you take knife sharpening as a side income producing endeavor then you could consider a Tormek setup finances permitting.

    #53783
    jabas2000
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 28

    Instead of a file i use the 100 grit diamond stone. And then i reprofile the knife

    #53816
    Richard
    Participant
    • Topics: 12
    • Replies: 154

    Don’t rule out buying the 50/80 WE stones either, they do a great job.  I used mine a lot since purchasing my sharpener.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #53822
    Jeff
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 32

    I bought a Tormek T4 recently to compliment the Wicked Edge.  It really excels at cleaing up a damaged blade or setting a different bevel in a very timely manner.  Very pricey way to go for just one knife though.  I second the 50/80 stones as a reasonably quick way to hog off metal comparatively quick.

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