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Bubba Blade

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Steve 12/31/2018 at 5:12 am.

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  • #48845

    Steve
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 2

    I have a 9″ tapered flex Bubba Blade filet knife.  I am able to get it sharp, but don’t seem to be able to get that “wicked” edge on it.  Does anyone have experience with this blade or similar blades?

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    #48848

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 55
    • Replies: 1597

    Welcome to the Wicked Edge Forum Steve.  Please provide some background.  Which WEPS model are you using and how old is your system and how long have you been using.  These are factors that influence the edge.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    #48854

    Steve
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
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    I have the WE100 system…100/200, 400/600/, 800/1000, 1500/9mic, 5mic/3.5mic, 1mic/.3mic.

    I opened the box on Christmas day.  I have worked on a couple of my carry around knives and been able to get them sharp enough to tree top the hair on my arm like a straight razor, but I just can’t seem to get that sort of edge on this filet knife.

    #48855

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 55
    • Replies: 1597

    Steve sounds like you’re on the right track.  The stones will yield better results as they continue to break in.  Concentrate on your technique and consistency in your strokes.  I think you’ll see improvement and results you’re wanting.  It usually takes a good 8 or 10 knives worth sharpening to break in the stones and get through the learning curve where you figure out how to put it all together.

    I suggest you clamp that curved bubba blade towards the center so it arcs evenly in front and behind the clamp, in a symmetrical position.  They’re not a particularly hard steel so it should sharpen easily.  I’d look to apply an 18 to 20 degree bevel to the bubba blade.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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    #48856

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 16
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    This knife looks thin and flexible. If so, it may be moving while you’re trying to sharpen it.

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    #48857

    NotSharpEnuff
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
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    Steve,

    The problem I’ve had with filet knives in general is that they tend to flex laterally as the stone presses the blade on both sides past the vise clamp.  Hence, you’re not maintaining a set angle to create a refined apex.  With thicker shorter blades it’s not an issue.  There are several posts in other threads about stabilizing long thin blades.

    Using a Sharpie and optical magnification should show if the blade flex is causing the problem.

    Ed K.

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    #48859

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1728

    In my experience, flexible blades seem to sharpen just as well as others, if you use a consistent technique and the same amount of pressure from stroke to stroke.

    When you can’t seem to figure out why a blade just doesn’t want to get sharp, think about the basics.  You need to reach the apex – or form a burr the entire length of the blade.  I’ve had knives that just seem to resist forming a sharp apex and expecting it to do it with the finer grits is a mistake.  The finer stones remove a fraction of the material removed by the prior grit, so it’s an uphill battle.

    If you don’t have the ability to see the edge under at least 10X and preferably >50X magnification, you won’t see the difference between a sharp knife that shaves hair and a sharp knife that barely cuts paper.

    If you don’t have a magnifier of some sort, you’ll need to use the burr as an indicator that you’ve really formed an apex.  Burrs can be difficult to feel if you use the alternate stroke technique, as they tend to be knocked off by the opposite stone.  Instead, stone one side at a time until you are sure that you’ve formed an apex for the entire length of the blade.   Try 10 – 20 strokes per side before taking the next 10 – 20 strokes on the other side.  Ten to 20 strokes should produce a burr you can feel if you’re at the apex.

    For me, this happens because I really, really hate to touch and edge with the coarser grits.  For instance, instead of starting with 200 grit, I’ll start with 400 grit, which I’m confident will not leave a damaged edge.  The result is that I spend way too much effort with my 400’s.  This is misspent effort and unreasonable in terms of the life of the stones.   My 400’s last about two years and my 600’s last three or four.   My 200’s lasted more than six years.

    #48862

    Steve
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 2

    Yes, I can see it flexing….I used the pin in the front to rest the blade on which helped, but can still see some flexing behind the clamp.  Even with what feels like a feather light touch, it is flexing a bit.

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