Advanced Search

Skandi grind on a bushcraft knife

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Pat 11/07/2019 at 7:28 pm.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #52489

    Dean
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 0

    Hi,

    a new member with a question I hope you can help with. I have a skandi grind bushcraft knife that I just cant seem to work out the settings for. Its 3.5 inches long and 3/45 inch thick. Any advcie on settings would be greatfully received.

    Thanks in advance.

    Cheers

    #52490

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1899

    Welcome to the Wicked Edge Forum, Dean.  Which W.E. model sharpener do you use?

    The Skandi, as you know, is essentially a sort of chisel grind or single sided ground knife.  The primary grind is called a “flat grind” or a “zero grind” on the Skandi because the bevel angle is the same angle as that entire angle ground side of the knife. The other side or back side is flat and vertical.  This compares with a regular ground knife that is primary ground on both sides to an angle with a narrower angled bevel at the apex or knife edge.

    If the Scandi knife can be clamped in your W.E. vise and you can lay the sharpening stones flat on the grind with-out the stones contacting the vise or jaws then it can be sharpened just like any other knife, with the W.E.  Only you sharpen just the one side.  To determine the flat grind angle I’d use a sharpie painted across the angled ground side to determine the angle, when the sharpie ink is cleanly removed across the whole height of the bevel or side grind.  If the sharpening stones conflict or make contact with the vise or jaws when attempting to sharpen the blade, then an adapter like the W.E. Low Angle Adapter or the Tormek Small Knife Holder will be needed.

    Each side of the Skandi knife will need to be sharpened independently since one side is ground at the bevel angle and the other side is flat or vertical.  The flat side you are essentially just removing the burr created while you sharpen the angle ground side.

     

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #52491

    Pat
    Participant
    • Topics: 14
    • Replies: 106

    Marc, how would you suggest to remove the burr on the flat side without creating a burr on the bevel side?

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 3 days ago by  Pat.
    #52494

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1899

    With regards to the burr I would attempt to use an edge leading stroke on the side I was sharpening as my last sharpening strokes with each grit in the progression, in an attempt to limit the burr formation, all together.  I would also employ a felt block pulled down the apex after each grit to attempt to remove any remnant of a burr.

    If there is a physically discernible burr or visually seen with microscopic inspection at the end of the sharpening and polishing progression.  While the knife is still clamped I would pull a piece of wood longitudinally down the length of the apex, like I had done with the felt block.

    If all these measures fail and a burr remains present, after un-clamping the knife I would lay the flat vertical un-sharpened side of the knife flat down on a leather hand strop and attempt edge trailing strokes to remove any remaining burr.  If the strop method was unsuccessful and a burr is still present I would repeat this flat edge trailing strokes on a very fine grit sharpening stone.  Followed up with the strop, again.

    These final burr removal strokes can also be utilized longitudinally along the knife edge by pulling the flat side of the knife across the strop or fine grit stone in a motion direction parallel or in line with the knife edge moving from heel to knife tip while maintaining contact with the full flat knife side against the strop or stone with light even pressure.  I would always finish up with the strop.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #52496

    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 6
    • Replies: 98

    Thank you Marc, I am glad to read your detailed posts about sharpening a Scandi blade. I guess the three Scandi knives I own ( Terava jaakaripuukko, Woodsknife Leuku and Marttiini folder) are not true Scandi grinds since they have a secondary bevel at 22 degrees. From what I have read in the past few months, this secondary micro bevel is to be found on most, if not all of the Scandi ground blades being sold these days and unless one decides to do a full re-grind, one has to accept things as they are. I am happy with the knives as they are and maybe some day I will purchase another for the purpose of experimentation. I am not even close to a marginal degree of experience to attempt it at this time.

    #52497

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1899

    Brewbear, thanks for sharing that.  I didn’t actually research Dean’s specific knife.  It may be one with the secondaty bevel, like you mentioned.  Either way,  I would sharpen them the same way as I suggested only sharpening just the secondary or the edge bevel.  The primary grind shouldn’t need addressing in that situation.

    If you look there may even be a slight bevel on the back side, too.  That would make it easier to sharp and to deal with burr formation.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #52498

    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 6
    • Replies: 98

    Looking at all three knives, the micro bevel is on both sides. The best I can describe it is a partial saber with a zero grind (well, sort of zero grind since it has a micro bevel on both sides of the edge). The “saber grind” extends roughly 7/16 from the apex/edge towards the spine with a 1/32 secondary bevel forming the edge ( Woodsknife Leuku). The Marttiini folder has a 9/32 saber (ish) grind with a 1/32 secondary bevel forming the edge.

    The edge you were describing above with a flat side and a chisel side edge (for lack of better terminology on my side) I found on the only Japanese sushi knife I own. I believe this kind of blade is right handed (the one I have) and there is also a blade with opposite geometry for left handed people.

    It would help if the OP could post a photo of the blade.

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 3 days ago by  Brewbear.
    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #52512

    Pat
    Participant
    • Topics: 14
    • Replies: 106

    Thanks Marc.  I will try some of those techniques.  I did watch Kyle’s video demonstrating the scissor sharpening adapter and after he was done, to remove the burr he just did strokes away from the edge on a strop (non-edge leading) on one of his WE strops after sharpening each leg of the scissors.

    I guess the key is inspection because if there is a burr, then it should be somewhat reflective.

    With regards to the burr I would attempt to use an edge leading stroke on the side I was sharpening as my last sharpening strokes with each grit in the progression, in an attempt to limit the burr formation, all together. I would also employ a felt block pulled down the apex after each grit to attempt to remove any remnant of a burr. If there is a physically discernible burr or visually seen with microscopic inspection at the end of the sharpening and polishing progression. While the knife is still clamped I would pull a piece of wood longitudinally down the length of the apex, like I had done with the felt block. If all these measures fail and a burr remains present, after un-clamping the knife I would lay the flat vertical un-sharpened side of the knife flat down on a leather hand strop and attempt edge trailing strokes to remove any remaining burr. If the strop method was unsuccessful and a burr is still present I would repeat this flat edge trailing strokes on a very fine grit sharpening stone. Followed up with the strop, again. These final burr removal strokes can also be utilized longitudinally along the knife edge by pulling the flat side of the knife across the strop or fine grit stone in a motion direction parallel or in line with the knife edge moving from heel to knife tip while maintaining contact with the full flat knife side against the strop or stone with light even pressure. I would always finish up with the strop.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.