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Did I Bite Off Too Much?

Recent Forums Main Forum Knife Specific Discussion Steel Did I Bite Off Too Much?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Richard 07/22/2019 at 11:35 am.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #51068

    Richard
    Participant
    • Topics: 8
    • Replies: 114

    I had a guy bring me a couple of knives yesterday to sharpen before he deploys to Kuwait next week.  The first is a Toor Viper with a 2″ CPM v3 steel blade.   The second one is a Winkler Dynamis dagger with two 5″ 80CRV2 blades.  So me being steel ignorant took both of them to the bench earlier today thinking I can knock them both out by the four o’clock Braves game.  Well, four hours later, I’m just finishing the tiny Viper.  Given I had to reprofile it (factory 20 degrees on the left side and 24 on the right, what?!?!), that was the hardest steel I’ve ever experienced in my short sharpening career with the WEPS.  So my question is am I going to be looking at the same hardness out of the Winkler Dynamis?  If so, I’ll forgo the WEPS and go right to the grinder, I envision me spending an entire week on this one.

    #51075

    NotSharpEnuff
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 81

    Richard,

    Below is a snip from zknives.com.  This site has great information on blade steel.  I have sharpened CPM 3V and it is hard work.  Especially if you have to reprofile the bevel.  Did you feel and hear the difference sharpening this steel compared to other blades?  To me, it was evident from the start that sharpening this steel was going to be a long time at the bench.

    When I searched 80Crv2, it just came up with “low alloy tool steel.”

    Ed K.


    <p id=”qStats” class=”lrv”>Generated 45475319 times.</p>

    CPM 3V(Crucible) – Introduced in 1997. It’s predecessor was now discontinued Vasco Die steel. SImply put, CPM 3V is a PM version of the Vasco Die steel. CPM 3V is one of the toughest tool steels available, especially interesting considering its high wear resistance. In other words, there are other tougher tool steels, AISI S1 steel for example, but none that have comparable wear resistance. CPM 3V also has 7.5% which definitely helps with corrosion resistance, although it is not a stainless steel. Initially, when the steel was new, Knife Steel FAQ stated it’d develop pitting instead of the surface rust. More recent tests show the opposite, even after prolonged exposure to the elements, CPM 3V didn’t develop pitting, just a surface rust. I suppose, if left outside in aggressive environment, CPM 3V would eventually develop pitting, but not before or in place surface rust. When maximum toughness is required, combined with very good wear resistance, 3V is a great choice. CPM 3V also works very well for small fixed blades and folders are high hardness 62-64HRC. Edge stability is very high even at 63HRC, because of its high toughness, and you won’t have edge dulling due to microchipping, which does happen for many alloys at that hardness.Manufacturing Technology – CPM

    Country – United States(US)

    <ul id=”lst3″ class=”cListMain”>

    • Crucible CPM 3V and equivalent steel knives reviews

    Known Aliases:
    Crucible – 3VCrucible – PM7.5-1.3-2.75CrMoV

    <ul id=”lst1″ class=”cListMain”>

     

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    #51076

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1917

    Richard,  if it’s more time consuming and more work then you want to do then maybe you “bit off too much”.

    It’s not anything that you’re not equipped and capable of doing and doing well.  Just apply the basics you’re already using.  Use your tools and aids.  Pay attention to detail and don’t move on to the next step before you’re finished with the present step.

    I can share in my experience that harder steels, for me, are sharpened better with a more perpendicularly angled stone stroke to the knife edge.  That is closer to an up-down stroke.  Work the edge in smaller sections. Then blend the scratch patterns with overlapping stone work. These hard and sometimes brittle steels seem to chip less with edge leading strokes. That is down and onto the knife edge, strokes.

    If you take your time you can do it, if you want to.  The W. E. will do as good a job as any sharpener can when done correctly with time, effort and attention to detail.

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #51078

    airscapes
    Participant
    • Topics: 11
    • Replies: 198

    It takes time.. you can not “Figure on” a set time per knife.. It is probably safe to say..I will be done sometime within the next 8 hours..

    This is like replacing the drain pipe from the washer to the stack pipe.. should take about 4 hours but plan on 3 days!

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #51084

    Richard
    Participant
    • Topics: 8
    • Replies: 114

    Well, the plan for today is to install the Razor Sharp Edgemaking System on my grinder and take a whack at the next knife.  I feel like if I just use the polishing wheel, I might be able to forgo some of the work I encountered yesterday by not reprofiling it, at least that’s the plan.  What do y’all think?

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002IXQD8/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    #51089

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1917

    I’d be learning and practicing on some other knives first with that big electric wheel.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #51146

    Richard
    Participant
    • Topics: 8
    • Replies: 114

    I’d be learning and practicing on some other knives first with that big electric wheel.

    Boy, you were right about that!

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