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Any chemists around here? Isopropanyl alcohol

Recent Forums Main Forum Suggestion Box Any chemists around here? Isopropanyl alcohol

This topic contains 30 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  wickededge 06/04/2018 at 10:49 am.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 31 total)
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  • #39127

    sksharp
    Participant
    • Topics: 9
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    I’m curious as to what you all mean when you say that something”leaves residue behind.”

    Alcohol 91% and above leaves “almost” nothing on the surface that you clean. I don’t know the chemistry of acetone but I have used it for cleaning things like paint, adhesives and the such and again on certain surfaces it leaves part of it’s properties on the surface(as do almost all cleaning substances) and it is a much harsher cleaner compared to the alcohol. This is just my opinion and not based in scientific fact, I’m by no means a scientist.

     

    #39139

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
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    I’m curious as to what you all mean when you say that something”leaves residue behind.”

    Alcohol 91% and above leaves “almost” nothing on the surface that you clean. I don’t know the chemistry of acetone but I have used it for cleaning things like paint, adhesives and the such and again on certain surfaces it leaves part of it’s properties on the surface(as do almost all cleaning substances) and it is a much harsher cleaner compared to the alcohol. This is just my opinion and not based in scientific fact, I’m by no means a scientist.

    It depends on the purity of the acetone used because additives or impurities present in low grade acetone may be left behind as residue. However, acetone itself should leave absolutely no residue (neither should ethanol or 2-propanol). It is more volatile (has a lower boiling point) than ethanol or 2-propanol. Acetone is a better solvent for many paints and varnishes than most alcoholic solvents which is why you might observe that it is a more “aggressive” solvent than ethanol or 2-propanol.

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    #44998

    JKingRPh
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
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    Hey MarchH.  The only alcohol that is denatured is ethyl alcohol, ethanol,  to make it taste very bad and  unfit for consumption as a beverage.  Isopropyl alcohol by nature , along with many other alcohols have a bad taste and are unfit for consumption, and in fact can be extremely toxic,  methanol, ie, wood alcohol , being one of the most toxic, consumption of which can often cause blindness, and in more extreme cases death.

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    #44999

    JKingRPh
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
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    I think acetone is a very good cleaner. However can be very harsh to certain surfaces and does leave residue behind. I do spritz my strops with 91% alcohol not so much to moisten the strop but it seems to help the paste or emulsion from coming of the strop onto the blade. After the first 3 of 4 times after loading the strop, I’m not sure that the compound coming off is as big of a concern.

    Acetone is an excellent solvent,  I have not received my WE yet, but did get in a set of ceramic stones.   Acetone could, and I am not saying that it will, adversely affect the adhesive holding the stones to the handles, or even soften and melt the handles themselves, just depends on what kind of plastic they are made of.   Basically acetone and plastics “don’t mix”

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    #45000

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
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    Here’s denatured alcohol. I don’t know if it’s ethyl alcohol or not.

    This quote is from Wikipedia: Rubbing alcohol is considered to be a surgical spirit rather than a methylated spirit since it is used in medical environments as a topical application. It is a type of denatured alcohol prepared from a special solution consisting of roughly 70 percent pure ethanol or isopropyl alcohol in its concentrated form.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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    #45027

    Todd Simpson
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 45

    Methanol, Ethanol and Iso-propyl Alcohol (IPA) have fairly similar cleaning performance.  IPA is preferred because it evaporates more slowly than methanol and ethanol and doesn’t have the regulatory issues of ethanol.  It’s available in high purity for a relatively low cost.

    Acetone is a stronger solvent, in that it will dissolve a wider range of organics.  The issue with cleaning with acetone (and any strong solvent for that matter) is that whatever you dissolve is left behind when the solvent evaporates.  This is why acetone usually leaves a film.  Even more frustrating is that those films are sometimes not easy to dissolve again.

    I have always taught that solvent cleaning should be a progression from weakest to strongest back to weakest.   The idea is to first rinse away as much as possible with IPA or water (eg you don’t want to be trying to dissolve chunks of dust), then dissolve what remains with acetone, (or toluene, or heptane) but DON’T LET THAT SOLVENT DRY as it will leave behind a film of everything you dissolved.  Instead, you want to displace the acetone (or whatever) with IPA, then blow the IPA off with compressed air.  It’s generally not possible to blow off fast evaporating solvents, so that’s why we displace them first with slow evaporating solvents (or water).

    Personally, I wouldn’t want to use anything stronger than IPA on a leather strop.   I have a spray bottle of IPA/DI water that I use to wet the surface and then wipe it with a paper towel.

    A good option for degreasing is to use an electronic cleaning spray.

     

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    #45038

    Frans
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
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    #45039

    JKingRPh
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
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    I’m late to this party, just having received my WE a couple of days ago.  As a pharmacist let me chime in.  Ethanol, probably the least toxic of alcohol, is the one found in all the various beverages, and can be bought as a straight alcohol under the name Everclear in 151 or 190 proof which is 75.5 and 95% alcohol by volume.   It is what chemists and pharmacists refer to as hydroscopic, meaning that it will absorb moisture out of the air when opened and gradually dilute to about 70%.   To avoid federal tax on ethanol, it has various compounds added to make it unpalatable, or bad tasting.  These compounds are chosen to be extremely hard to remove, ie, normal distillation will not remove them as the will vaporize and recondense at about the same temperatures.

    It is available for special purposes in various other forms, such as absolute alcohol which is 200 proof or 100%, and again it will not remain that concentration for long after opening a sealed container.  It is also very expensive.   Then perhaps Organic can add his two cents worth as a chemist. I suspect chemically pure and reagent grades are available although I have never seen them.

    Normally 70% ethanol of the non denatured variety is used medically in preparing some liquid forms of medications for oral use, although that use has decreased dramatically over the last 20 or so years, as many “elixirs” which are defined as iso alcoholic  or water alcohol mixtures and been reformulated to simply syrups, so that mostly pediatric patients will not be exposed to alcohol.     Denatured alcohol can be used for skin cleaning and sterilization, and is often found in the little disposable alcohol swabs.

    Isopropyl alcohol is most commonly found as 70% and sometimes as 99%, and can be used externally for the same applications as denatured ethanol

    Generally both are good , mild  solvents, sometimes one or the other will be better for a specific purpose.

    Acetone is another class of chemicals altogether,  ketones, and is much stronger and aggressive, dissolving or damaging many plastics  and paints, and I think one of the things that will dissolve and remove cured superglue(cyanoacrylate or methylacrylate)

    If you have a stone glued to a glass or metal surface one of the various alcohols would probably be ok for cleaning,  acetone would probably soften and weaken the bond.

     

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    #46446

    Shelley
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 5

    Not the same stuff but for cleaning out sharpening stones (have not tried on diamond yet) I use pleasured brake cleaner in a can, spray it on, the pressure helps to push the metal out and it dries quickly too…stinks but.

    #46447

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1799

    Shelley my concern is for the adhesive that adheres the stone to the plastic handles and the plastic itself.  I don’t know if the brake cleaner will soften the plastic but I would think it may break the adhesive down and let the stones come loose.  One forum member cleaned his diamond stones with “Simple Green” degreaser / cleaner and it dissolved the adhesive and the stones came loose.  I would believe that Simple Green is a less aggressive cleaner than brake cleaner.  I’d look for something tried and true to use like Isopropyl alcohol.

    I seldom if ever clean my diamond stones other then to wipe them with a dry paper towel.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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    #46448

    Mikedoh
    Moderator
    • Topics: 38
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    I use a VERY light scrubbing with a nail brush and bar keepers friend and water. No soaking. Just rinse and stand on end to dry. The “stones”are adhered to the handles with a strong double sided sticky “tape” . 2¢

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    #46449

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1813

    I don’t clean my diamond stones more than once or twice per year, but I clean my diamond film every other usage, using a few drops of isopropyl alcohol and an electric scrubber, as recommended by one of our forum members stationed in the middle east.  It really works well, doesn’t seem to affect the abrasive matrix.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004EBTOM6/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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    #46450

    NickedEdge
    Participant
    • Topics: 9
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    Shelley my concern is for the adhesive that adheres the stone to the plastic handles and the plastic itself. I don’t know if the brake cleaner will soften the plastic but I would think it may break the adhesive down and let the stones come loose. One forum member cleaned his diamond stones with “Simple Green” degreaser / cleaner and it dissolved the adhesive and the stones came loose… I’d look for something tried and true to use like Isopropyl alcohol. I seldom if ever clean my diamond stones other then to wipe them with a dry paper towel.

    Hi Shelley! I’ll chime with support for the basic sentiments expressed since your post here…nix the idea of brake cleaner entirely…I know for a fact it will affect the polyethylene plastic in the handle and more than likely dissolve the adhesive used on affixing the platen to the handle.

    Simple Green, and other citrus oil based cleaners going to have the same effect on the adhesive. I recall some folks in the EU and/or Commonwealth weren’t able to get isopropyl alcohol but not sure if thats the case for you folks.

    One of the other guys mentioned BarKeepers friend which is mild water soluble and surface friendly abrasive. Thumbs up on that stuff! You might see if you can get some through your New Zealand Amazon store. I’ve used it on multiple surfaces with very satisfactory results including some large diamond stones I have for hand sharpening (which I’ll probably never use again now that I have a WE on the way! lol) At any rate Shelley best wishes and good luck with your new WE!

    Edit: Bar Keeper’s Friend …Shelley, Amazon really reams us for this product online (as is typical these days) but I posted the link for your visual reference. It’s so highly thought of that it may be available for less than $5USD on the shelves of your local grocery store or whatever store you might have like a Walmart or Target. Best George

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by  NickedEdge. Reason: Accuracy
    #46455

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
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    I can warn against Simple Green, it will make your stones fall off.

    -Clay

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    #46458

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
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    In some English-speaking country(s?) the term “stones” is a euphemism for testicles.  Example usage:  “Boy, he’s got a pair of stones!”

    You really don’t want your stones to fall off.  So stay away from Simple Green.

    LOL

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