Advanced Search

Wusthoff Knife Block Design

Recent Forums Main Forum Off Topic Wusthoff Knife Block Design

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #47867
    BubsterX1
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 2

    I just finished sharpening one of the steak knives that came with my Wusthof set.  I kind of hate to put it back in the Wusthof block because the block is designed with all the kitchen knives inserted horizontally (great) but the steak knives inserted vertically with the edge down.  I recognize that knives are used on wooden cutting boards and they don’t go dull from contact with the wood immediately, but I wonder how quickly my steak knives are getting dulled by being inserted and removed from the block.  Apparently Wusthof did not think this is an issue, and maybe it isn’t, but I noticed that Henckels designed its block with all knives, including the steak knives, suspended horizontally.  I would welcome any comments on this.

    Thanks a lot.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #47868
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 66
    • Replies: 2622

    Use your knives and enjoy them.  IMO, if they aren’t moving with applied force against the surface they aren’t dulling.  The edge is not as fragile as you think.  It’s designed to cut through a meat product against a hard ceramic, porcelain surface or similar substrate.  Most people use these kind of knives forever and never sharpen them.  Besides, you bought the Wicked Edge to sharpen your knives.  Think of it as job security.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    Dan
    #47869
    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 929

    I wouldn’t worry about it too much. The knives will dull much more from use than they will from inserting and withdrawing from the block. It is probably a better design to have them go in horizontally, but the difference will be insignificant in the long term. Also, when they go dull you have a Wicked Edge and will be able to restore the edge quickly.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #47870
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 66
    • Replies: 2622

    Welcome to the Wicked Edge Forum, BubsterX1

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

    #47871
    BubsterX1
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 2

    Thanks, guys, for the fast replies!  This is comforting to me because I really like my wooden block apart from the positioning of the steak knives and it would be wrong to put Wusthof knives in a competitor’s block.

    Now I just need to do some research to figure out why I seem to keep getting a longer bevel on the tip end compared to the heel end no matter how I position the knife in the vise.

    Have a good afternoon.

    Andrew

    #47872
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 66
    • Replies: 2622

    Andrew, It’s probably due to the configuration or width of the tip grind as compared to the width of the heel grind.

    The issues you sight you would never have even considered before you purchased and began using the Wicked Edge.  Isn’t it funny how protective we become of a piece of steel once we’ve invested some time, effort and care in it.  We become like protective parents of our knives.

     

     

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

    #47874
    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 929

    Regarding the issue towards the tip: Try clamping the blade much closer to the tip. It will look strange with the majority of the blade sticking out behind the clamp, but you might find that the tip comes out better. Finding the sweet spot is about trial and error, so it will take some practice. Check out Marc’s thread on “How I find the Sweet Spot.”

    #47880
    BubsterX1
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 2

    Thanks again.  I found a video in the knowledgebase about finding the sweet spot.  I hadn’t really pictured the idea of there being sort of a rounded horizon for the sweep of the sharpening stones, and I had been clamping onto the center of the knife.  As you say, Organic, the clamp often needs to be quite a bit closer to the tip end.  Not that I understand this, it should be easier to find the sweet spot by clamping and then doing a test sweep with a fine stone to see where the marker gets removed along the bevel.  Finding the sweet spot may be the most challenging part of the learning curve.

    #47881
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 66
    • Replies: 2622

    BubsterX1, I just want to point out, we are trying to sharpen our knife edges.  That is bringing the opposite side bevels together in a manner that these planes precisely intersect in a line; the knife edge or the apex of the bevel.  It doesn’t matter how wide or tall the bevels are as long as the edge is sharp.  The appearance and the evenness of the bevel size is aesthetics and contributes little to the edges sharpness, as long as the intersection is precise and consistent across the entire knife edge length.  It is an indication of the angle the bevel has been sharpened at that place along the knife edge.  These visual differences as we traverse down the knife edge are strictly about our own visual appeal.

    Again, these are things we never noticed or considered before we had the Wicked Edge Precision Sharpener and the ability to control the aspects of our knife edges.  It takes time and practice for all these aspects to come together; sharpness and aesthetics.  Don’t sacrifice one for the other.  Of primary importance to me is edge sharpness.  Once I can achieve that I can work on the visual appeal.

    I’ve been at this for quite a few years now and I continue to learn and refine my skills each and every time I sharpen a knife again.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.