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CPM S110V

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  • #40791
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 64
    • Replies: 2474

    Yes I have. Many various kitchen knives, ZT folders, Kershaw folders and spyderco folders. No others using S110V though.

    Did you sharpen these knives with you’re current setup to a sharpness of your liking?

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

    #40792
    Rich
    Participant
    • Topics: 10
    • Replies: 51

    Yes I did.  All of the other knives I have sharpened turned out great!

    I had a conversation with Ken Schwartz today.  His opinion is that the vanadium content being so high, the chosera stones are not able to erode these steel nuggets.  His recommendation was two fold,

    1. Add a small amount of cbn (WATER BASED ONLY) of the same micron size to the chosera stone surface. This will help to produce more slurry by eroding the chosera more rapidly while adding diamond particles to the slurry taking care of the vanadium in the steel.
    2. Nubatama Platinum stones.  It was explained that these stones will take care of these harder steels where the chosera fall short.  I’m considering 1500/3000 to start, then strop from there with cbn/poly diamond emulsion.

    Also, I have DLF on their way.  I know these will take care of the issue but it’s good to have options…

    #40793
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 64
    • Replies: 2474

    Rich is this your “Rube Goldberg” Solution?

    You might try Shapton’s Glass Stones

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

    #40795
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 64
    • Replies: 2474

    Here’s a quote from another Forum:

    Here’s Ken Schwarz review of the Bamboo 150, I would say there is a pretty clear promotion of these over other highly regarded brands/stones…

    “It’s 205x75x50 mm in size – a brick sort of burnt orange in color. And it works like no other coarse stone I’ve ever used. It cuts metal fast and it dishes slow.

    It cuts faster than the 120 pro or GS, faster than the synthetic Ohmura and WAY faster than other finer grit stones like the Beston 500, Chosera 400, and other 220 and 320 Shapton stones. It leaves a coarser finish than the finer grit stones I mentioned, except the Beston 500 which doesn’t give as fine a finish, cut as fast, or dish as slowly.

    So far it hardly dishes at all. This is perhaps its most valuable trait. I’ve used it on a bunch of CPM 154 Addicts to set bevel angles and a bunch of Aritsugu-As – and I have yet to have any mud from the stone to show for it. Have yet to need to lap it! The same amount of work on any other stone would give me a mud puddle. Burr generation is rapid.

    I followed it with a Shapton GS 500. It was an excellent combination. I would also consider it as a starting point for going through the Chosera series – following this stone with a 400 Chosera for instance. From there I switched to some natural stones (aoto and Yaginoshima asagi) for these initial sessions with the Bamboo 150.

    The 150 Nubatama Bamboo is a finer scratch pattern than the XXC DMT or Atoma 140 and is a perfect followup for them.

    It is a porous stone. I would suggest soaking it for about 5 minutes first. That fully saturates the stone. You will need to add water to it to keep it wet. It isn’t recommended that you leave it soaking as it doesn’t require it.

    This is a stone for removing metal. It leaves an edge suitable for slice cutting paper or coarse work. Very “toothy.” It is too coarse for a final finish but excAs accomplished a knife sharpener Ken Schwartz is (Hi, Ken!), he is also an accomplished businessman, and is in business with a few people in the knife industry, and he is the dealer for the Nubatamas, and a few other products. Not to say you can’t trust his information, and I don’t have any issue with doing business with him, and Ken is a fairly nice, decent guy, who is very knowledgeable. But just be aware that he often represents and sells the sharpening equipment you see him using and reviewing. Again, nothing wrong with that and I wish him success. ellent for repairs – chips and tips. Strongly consider this stone for work on single bevel knives.”

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #41119
    Rich
    Participant
    • Topics: 10
    • Replies: 51

    I wanted to follow up on my progress with this knife. I received diamond lapping films from Nanolap, 6/3/1/0.5/0.1 micron.  These did the trick!  Much sharper thank before!!  I did have the same issues with the 0.5/0.1 micron films with larger scratches showing up.  I will proceed with the DLF to 1 micron, stop there and move to strops!

    I really enjoy the chosera stones and will continue to use them where applicable.

    Thanks for all of the input!

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #41125
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    I will try the Jende 1.0/0.5 lappping film. When I have time (and my armed is healed) is have the intention to sharpen an S30 knife, my most used pocket knife or a 13C26 (my most used kitchen knife) using all grits from 100-1500 stones and then the DLF. And perhaps some strops. It is my intention to make microscope photographs after every stone/DLF.

    If I have time I also want to try to repeat this on a very wear-resistant steel (see another topic).

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

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