Advanced Search

3D printed Custom handles

Recent Forums Main Forum Pass Around and Buy / Sell / Trade Want to Sell 3D printed Custom handles

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #58747
    Micheal Fuller
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 4

    Hello everyone I’m new to the community but I’ve been using the sharpeners for almost 2 years. I have 10 years of experience in 3D printing and 3D modeling and I’ve finally gotten around to making my own custom handles for the stones I want to try out with my gen 3 pro sharpener.

    my plan is to sell kits.

    my MK1 stones are going to be using bushing to match the current rods but I’m also going to be making an “upgrade” kit that will swap out the rods with different one and the stone will be using liner motion bearings like a 3D printer for super smooth and tight tolerance sharpening.

    Attachments:
    #58749
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 73
    • Replies: 2721

    Welcome to the forum!

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

    #58750
    Micheal Fuller
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 4

    thanks for letting me know there is a forum!

     

    #58751
    Micheal Fuller
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 4

    here is some renders to help understand the idea

    nothing 3d printed will be touching the rod to make sure it stays smooth

    Attachments:
    #58761
    AllanK
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 1

    I’ll be interested to see where this goes! And, welcome to the forum.

    #58762
    Micheal Fuller
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 4

    a Lot of the parts im waiting on come in this weekend so ill start spamming post updates of the progress next weekish

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #58797
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 38
    • Replies: 2094

    Sorry I’m late on this one, but here’s one tidbit I have to share:

    If the long bore diameter is larger than the rod diameter, you’ll want rods which are extra long.  If you slide the handle high enough to have the rod drop out of the upper bushing, you’ll see some angular error and if the bushing are a tight fit, you’ll see some binding between the rod and lower bushing.

    I’m currently using a design in which there is no bore or bushing.  The two halves are flat, with 1/4″ spacers on each side of the rod.  The spacers are attached to the two halves with double-faced tape.  The side-to-side tolerance is irrelevant.  Imagine the halves are 3/4″ wide and the spacers are 3/16″ wide and attached so that their outboard edges line up with the sides of the two halves.  That leaves a channel 1/8″ wider than the rod diameter.  No precision required as side-to-side movement doesn’t effect angular accuracy.  The thickness of the two layers of double-faced tape allow just enough clearance for the rod to move freely in the channel.  If you don’t follow, consider that I don’t have a round bore for the rod.  I have a slot.  The rod can move sideways in the slot but not relative to the stone faces.  You only need accuracy in the axis perpendicular to the stone faces.  Not side-to-side.

    For stone-to-stone uniformity, invest your efforts in the repeatability of the distance between stone face and the flat back.  Generally, a 0.010″ error will result in a 1/1oth degree error in accuracy.  I cut my spacers from a 0.250″ thick slab of ABS using a table saw.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.