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Nutty technique for determining relative sharpness

Recent Forums Main Forum Techniques and Sharpening Strategies Nutty technique for determining relative sharpness

This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Leo James Mitchell 09/29/2011 at 8:49 pm.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #477

    don griffith
    Participant
    • Topics: 4
    • Replies: 51

    Nuts. Specifically, peanuts. One/half peanut, to be exact.

    So, here’s the plan.
    Materials you’ll need:

    A 1/4 in. grid mat, just like they sell in the fabric and sewing stores,
    Peanuts– shelled and unsalted,
    Several small squares of balsa (not too thick), sized same as the grids on the mat you use,
    2 oz. George Dickel Bourbon
    Ice
    Heavy bottom glass

    Proposed Method:

    Step 1.
    Drop ice into glass
    Pour George Dickel over ice
    Estimate 2 oz., then pour extra because you know you’re pathetic at estimation….
    Sip…
    Sip…
    Sip…

    Okay, now we’re ready.

    Step 2.
    Place balsa square on grid mat, centered and aligned;
    Place unsalted peanut on balsa, flat side down, aligned lengthwise with balsa grain;
    Rotate you or the mat 90° so the cut is across the peanut and across the balsa grain;
    Sip to steel your nerves;
    Apply pressure slowly with knife edge to the high point of the curved peanut surface;
    Measure the distance to the farthest piece.
    Sip to relax your nerves;
    Sip…
    Sip…
    Repeat sequence at Step 1 with next knife.

    Conclusion Theory:
    You will be able to see which knife is sharpest by how small the distance is a peanut piece travels,
    or
    You’ll be able to tell how much Goerge Dickel you’ve had by how far a peanut piece travels.

    If you guys have a better method, feel free. But I’m not sure there’s a better method than Geoge Dickel…:)

    #478

    Larry
    Participant
    • Topics: 5
    • Replies: 44

    Makers Mark might make a good substitute if you run out of George Dickel

    #479

    Leo James Mitchell
    Participant
    • Topics: 64
    • Replies: 687

    Really, for us much older, more delicate gentlemen, a more sophisticated elixir like Lagavulin Single Malt Scotch would be preferable, while puffing on a Mpntecristo cigar. In the background some Bach organ music like the Toccata and Fugue in D minor. Ah perfection.

    Leo

    #486

    Doug Williams
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 43

    Really, for us much older, more delicate gentlemen, a more sophisticated elixir like Lagavulin Single Malt Scotch would be preferable, while puffing on a Mpntecristo cigar. In the background some Bach organ music like the Toccata and Fugue in D minor. Ah perfection.

    Leo

    Great Leo! Bach organ music is great for the sharpening process! Lagavulin 16 year makes for a truly wicked edge! If you don’t have any Lagavulin, Laphroaig cask strength is a good substitute. I’ve got both and I rotate them, just in case. 😆 I’ve given up on cigars, though. Wife and kids hate them, so I just buy more scotch instead.

    #487

    Leo James Mitchell
    Participant
    • Topics: 64
    • Replies: 687

    Doug
    It is so good to hear that another person around here likes Lagavulin…yes 16 year old is perfect, but I wouldn’t hesitate to sip on some Laphroig when the occasion arises. It is not quite as refined a taste as the Lag, but it is still excellent when one wants the peatiness of Islay. Mustn’t drink very much though when you are sharpening or bad things can happen! LOL!
    Warm regards mate
    Leo

    #489

    Jende Industries
    Participant
    • Topics: 14
    • Replies: 342

    I rather fancy a nice bottle of Margaux… This way the sharpening improves as the wine begins to come to life B)

    #551

    Leo James Mitchell
    Participant
    • Topics: 64
    • Replies: 687

    I rather fancy a nice bottle of Margaux… This way the sharpening improves as the wine begins to come to life B)

    See how weird I am Tom…my taste in Scotch runs at near 100 dollars a bottle, but when it comes to wines my palate isn’t so demanding…a $15 bottle of Australian Yellowtail Shiraz is more to my taste. Red wine every time, since white wines don’t appeal for me, with the exception of Gray Monk Pinot Grise from British Columbia. :cheer:

    Leo

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