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Blade Cleaning

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  • #30882
    Jon J
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    • Topics: 6
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    When I sharpen a knife, as I have learned here from all you great fellas, I either put blue painters tape on the blade where it will sit in the vise or if it is a full flat grind, I use a drawer liner material to make up the difference. And when I move to the next stone in order, I use a paper towel sprayed with a small bit of alcohol, to clean the blade for the next grit. And while doing this, I guess the alcohol has gotten on top of and beneath the tape, and once I finish with the sharpening and pull all the tape off, you can still see where the tape was before. Like it has stained the metal. This is both on satin and acid wash blades. I’ve rubbed them with the same alcohol trying to clean it off, but at just the right angle under the right light, you can still see where the tape used to be. Any of you guys have any suggestions?

    #30883
    Geocyclist
    Participant
    • Topics: 25
    • Replies: 524

    Try WD-40, it can’t hurt.  Maybe a degreaser or something that would remove adhesive. I don’t have any acid wash blades so I don’t know how they react to different things.  For cleaning: Flitz (it like a fine polish so be careful with coated, acid wash).

    you could tape the whole blade and soak in alcohol to get the same treatment.  I would say this is last option.

    Sounds like the alcohol broke down the adhesive and/or tape material, but it won’t remove it.

    Let us know what works.

     

     

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    #30884
    Mark76
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    • Topics: 179
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    I use acetone (nailpolish remover) to remove both glue stains and remaining Sharpie marks. You may want to give it a try.

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

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    #30885
    gregory mais
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
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    you could use goo gone or lighter fluid (zippo or ronson ) i think either would work then use the alcohol because they are both petrolium products . as for cleaning the blade between grits i just wipe off with a little soapy wet paper towel

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    #30886
    Josh
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    • Topics: 89
    • Replies: 1672

    I use the green can of brake kleen from the auto store… it has acetone in it and will last a LONG time. This will remove most of the tape residue, especially when you use it in conjunction w/ a microfiber rag (NOT a paper towel). However, I have learned not to tape acid etched/stonewashed blades unless you use a residue free tape to do so, the normal masking tape will almost leave a permanent stain.

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    #30889
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 38
    • Replies: 2094

    To remove Sharpie marks and glue, I use alcohol or if that doesn’t do the job, lacquer thinner.  You gotta watch out with the stronger solvents.  Recently I wiped down a Chicago Cutlery knife with the lacquer thinner and got some on the handle material, which melted.  Had to re-sand it and polish it.

    To remove dust and metal filings between grits, I use a Swiffer duster.  One quick swipe on each side with a relatively fresh duster will remove everything.  Wouldn’t work with waterstones though…

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    #31048
    Xbander
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    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 68

    Might try that once a year car polish, it it designed to remove every kind of stain and not damage the car paint or clear coat.  Never seen it hurt a knife blade.  It will remove the glue from the tape as well.  Worth a try,   I have used it for years to clean my iPad and iPhone screen, makes swiping smooth, just be very careful to never let it get into the camera or mike holes and remove it before it sets.

    Jim

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