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Angle cube marking blade

Recent Forums Main Forum Angle cube marking blade

This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 11/29/2015 at 11:22 am.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #29550

    Wapiti0223
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 2

    good morning,

    i wanted to ask if the marking of the blade takes place of the angle cube or is the angle cube a necessary tool for the system?

    Thank you

    frank

    #29551

    Anonymous
    • Topics: 14
    • Replies: 427

    Welcome to the wicked edge forum
    Marking the angle just gives you a reference as to how the stones effect the current angle. If the current angle is wrong, the sharpie mark wont help. The sharpie is just a visual reference as to how close your stone are to the currant angle. The ” cube ” gives you the correct set point that you desire. It confirms that the left side stone angle is what you actually want. and also the right side. I think you are asking if you need the cube… In my opinion, its an inexpensive tool to do the job correctly.. the cube also verifies the profile for each knife that you sharpen. If you have ten knives that are used for different things, like Work knives, everyday carry knives, utility knives, kitchen cutlery, one you categorize the profile of each knife. you can then just set up the wicked edge, using the profile cube. and with just a few strokes, bring the blade back to its perfect sharpness. Some steel will actually grow and oxidize in the draw when never being used, then when you go to use it a year later might find it to have lost its edge. With a known profile of the knife it should only take ten minutes to bring it back to razor sharpness. Some knives use a compound profile, some use an aggressive angle , and some are best used with a less aggressive angle.
    Get the cube..
    Bill aka ET

    #29552

    Wapiti0223
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 2

    Bill,

    Thank you for the help sir. I will get an angle cube. Where is a good place to get various knife blade angles or do you just use the cube to match existing?

    Frank

    #29553

    Anonymous
    • Topics: 14
    • Replies: 427

    This forum had a knife data base on the old forum, but has yet to be transferred to this forum. should be soon. you can use a sharpie to profile the existing edge. then set up your wicked edge. You can not use the cube to determine the blades existing angle. But you can use the sharpie’s mark as a guide. take a stroke and see if the black comes off the top of the edge or the bottom of the edge. or if it removed all of the black…. if this is the case you set up your W.E. properly for that particular blade.
    if you only remove part of the black then you have to adjust the angle slightly , either up or down based on what part of the edge you remove. once you find the angle, you can store that information somewhere for that knife , so the next time you sharpen it, you will know the angles, and the placement within the vise. depth and position from center. If this does not help, just tell me. Ill try to make it easier. Don’t over think this… its not that hard, but sometimes angles and geometry causes some people to have a brain lock.. its not a big deal…. once you get it, you will smack yourself in the head once you see how easy it is..
    I’m always happy to help if I can.
    Bill aka ET

    #29554

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1835

    ET is right in that the Sharpie is mainly used to match your set-up to the existing bevels, but the Sharpie can also tell you if you are getting close to, or have reached the apex.  It serves as a first level of inspection device.  Next levels of inspection are the jeweller’s loupe and USB microscope.

    I use the AngleCube on every knife I sharpen.  I only use the degree graduations on the horizontal bar to make coarse adjustments for multi-bevel edges.  Having done so, I then use the AngleCube to zero-in on my intended angle.  Too easy to use and too inexpensive not to buy.

    With blades which are fairly broad-faced, you can use the AngleCube on them – mainly to confirm or adjust for verticality.  For instance, for an FFG blade with 7 degrees difference between faces, you’d look for 3.5 degrees on each side.  If you couldn’t find vertical to your satisfaction, you can use the AngleCube readings to compensate between left and right.  For example, if you read +2.5 degrees on the left and -4.5 on the right, you’d know that the blade is tilted one degree to the left.  To compensate, you’d set the left angle one degree lower and the right to one degree higher.

    I would be loathe to give up my AngleCube or my USB microscope.

    #29560

    Wapiti0223
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 2

    Thank you guys really appreciate all the help! Will practice on a couple with the marker and order the angle cube.

    Frank

    #29579

    Anonymous
    • Topics: 14
    • Replies: 427

    Making different left side and right side angles to compensate for vice angle etc is one of the reaaon I did not purchase the Gen III system with single cam lever. It does not allow for individual left and right hand adjustments.

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