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System Passaround

This topic contains 18 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Josh 07/03/2014 at 9:52 pm.

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  • #19323

    Cliff Stamp
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    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 76

    a)I use water a decent amount and then let it air dry and have had no issues w/ corrosion to date… I also use a 50/50 solution of windex/rubbing alcohol sometimes, but I have really been enjoying the water lately.

    I have never had a problem personally, but I have had a decent amount of people complain to me that they used water (after hearing it from me) and now their diamond stones are all rusted. You would think that it would be obvious to just rinse and dry them, but it isn’t for a lot of people and if I was making/selling the WE I would not want to have to deal with that with the customer service side. In general people are not that reasonable and the solution might be as simple as to just put in a small bottle of a solution which can be used to treat water as there are many of them which are available.

    b) do you think it would be beneficial to have a certain course waterstone cut for the WEPS paddles that would be much more efficient of a cutter for the heavy re-profile work? I know there are shaptons and choseras out there already… any recommendations?

    There are some nice coarse stones, but then you have issues of maintenance and the real big one is wear because if the stone becomes different in thickness it will change the angle and you have to account for that when you switch grits. I am not saying it is impossible but you would want to be very clear so as to avoid people complaining about issues which are caused by wear in the stone.

    f) I find that it doesn’t ever load up if I have a bowl of water in front of my weps and then just “paint” the stones w/ water every time I alternate… are you having a different experience?

    No, but more than me have been using this, I just noted they were loaded when I took them out this time and just scrubbed them off.

    g) If you send it to me I can cerakote it pink for you! 😉 that should put ppl’s mind at ease! seriously though, I don’t think Clay had this in mind when he got it… I think people in New Mexico and ppl in Canada view the issue of guns slightly different 😛

    No doubt, it is really silly but that is a common reaction here, black knives are weapons, pink knives are cute. I even had a pink case made for a fixed blade specifically just to check that out and no one reacts harshly to it. This is extremely silly, but it happens.

    #19326

    Josh
    Participant
    • Topics: 89
    • Replies: 1669

    thanks for the clarification.

    b) do you think it would be beneficial to have a certain course waterstone cut for the WEPS paddles that would be much more efficient of a cutter for the heavy re-profile work? I know there are shaptons and choseras out there already… any recommendations?

    There are some nice coarse stones, but then you have issues of maintenance and the real big one is wear because if the stone becomes different in thickness it will change the angle and you have to account for that when you switch grits. I am not saying it is impossible but you would want to be very clear so as to avoid people complaining about issues which are caused by wear in the stone.
    [/quote]

    Yeah true. Well this would only be for certain customers (like me) that wanted to upgrade, it would not be for the general populace. I have a DMT duo sharp stone that I lap my water stones on, so I should be good there. Do you have any suggestions on quick cutting stones (that would be faster than the 100 diamond stones but not leave such deep scratches?)

    #19337

    Cliff Stamp
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 76

    Do you have any suggestions on quick cutting stones (that would be faster than the 100 diamond stones but not leave such deep scratches?)

    The cutting speed is directly related to the scratch depth, in general if the stone has a swarf then it is always smearing out these scratches in use (as the slurry is moving in a random direction).

    The problem with coarse stones is one of balance. You have to make the stone so that it releases fresh abrasive just as it gets worn. If you make it too easy to release then you just end up seeing abrasive constantly flushed off the stone. if you make it too hard to release then the stone just wears smooth and you have to try to recut it which can only be done with a most coarse stone or some kind of dressing tool (like just cutting it with a ceramic saw).

    I have used Nubatama stones which are very coarse and they just wear smooth, they won’t release the abrasive. I have used King stones which release the abrasive very quickly and thus while they cut well you can literally see the hollow develop in them in use just like you can see rust form on L6 while you cut an onion. I currently use a SPS-II 240 which is very nice for hard to grind steels (HSS) but it is a waste on anything simpler because the abrasive will come off too quickly.

    There are lots of coarse stones, here is a post from Stu, who while he sells stones, tends to give practical and not overly biased information : http://www.woodworkforums.com/156282-favourite-coarse-stones/#post1527017 .

    #19341

    Josh
    Participant
    • Topics: 89
    • Replies: 1669

    I just started another thread on this… stay tuned

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