Advanced Search

What is the most wear-resistant steel for pocket knives

Recent Forums Main Forum Techniques and Sharpening Strategies Tips for Specific Knife Grinds and Styles What is the most wear-resistant steel for pocket knives

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #41131
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    Recently we have had a few discussions here about wear-resistant knives and their properties (like brittleness). What do you think is the most wear-resistant knife that is also resilient enough? I am waiting for a Para 3 Maxamet, but I don’t know whether that would be the best choice.

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    #41142
    Josh
    Participant
    • Topics: 89
    • Replies: 1671

    imho, the factors that are much more important than steel type are:

    • heat treatment quality, and hardness level (to a lesser extent)
    • geometry of the blade and ease of sharpening
    • Stainless properties (if that is important to you)

    I made a few reblades for my hinderer and Emerson, out of 10v (extremely high carbide, non-stainless), m4 (high carbide, non stainless), and AEB-l (low carbide, stainless). I haven’t finished the AEB-l blade out yet, but interestingly enough I haven’t been able to tell much of a difference in edge retention between the m4 and 10v over the vg10 blade I have on a kizer (which also sharpens much easier) – this was when testing edge retention on clean cardboard and in every day use/experience. But I do admit that many more runs would be needed on cardboard cutting before I could be certain, it definitely wasn’t a scientifically controlled test lol

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #41143
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    Thanks, Josh. It is indeed interesting that you didn’t find much difference between M4 and AEB-L. Now I’ve never had a blade in M4, but AEB-L (or 13C26) is definitely my favorite stainless steel for kitchen knives. I am aware that there are of course many other factors important in a blade steel than the ones I mentioned. But I am now particularly looking for a (pocket) knife with very long edge retention. The Spydercos Paramilitary 2 and Para 3 in Maxamet look very appealing to me.

    Interestingly, I sometimes read accounts of people who have major problems sharpening S30V or S35V. I guess your sharpening equipment also plays a large role, because I’ve never had a problem with those steels with my WE.

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #41144
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    This is an interesting table I found on another forum:

    [​IMG]

    And this is an interesting site listing the properties of many high-end steels: http://knifeinformer.com/discovering-the-best-knife-steel/

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #41147
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 1941

    I’ve never had a problem with those steels with my WE.

    I think diamonds are the difference.  I’ve seen posts on other knife forums by users who complained that the ZDP-189 was too hard to sharpen on ceramic sticks.  I can sense that my ZDP knives are tougher to sharpen than my other knives, but not enough to complain about.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #41148
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    +1

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    #41155
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 61
    • Replies: 2124

    I can definitely feel the difference when sharpening these super hard steels with the Wicked Edge System.  I’ve found the same steel used by two different knife makers, to make similar size and style knives, may feel totally differently when sharpened.  I agree with Josh that this must have to do with how it was hardened.  Also the same super hard steel feels differently when sharpened in a nickel polished knife then when I sharpen a non-polished plain steel clad knife.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #41160
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    I’ve done a little research and it appears that S110V is a bit more ductile/resilient/tough than Maxamet. And the first time I saw Maxamet described it was described as rather “chippy”. Since S110V seems nearly as wear-resistant (is it?) as Maxamet, wouldn’t it be a better idea to use S110V? The Paramilitary 2 happens to be available in both steels.

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    #41168
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    I’ve had interesting discussions at Bladeforums and the Spyderco forum about Maxamet and other steels, mainly S110V. At least three people recommended that I do not make the decision between Maxamet and S110V (also a steel with great edge retention) on the basis of their edge retention, but on the basis of whether I wanted my steel to be stainless. S110V is stainless and Maxamet is not, and according to these people their edge retention is similar. I live in a moderate dry climate, but I was told that Maxamet would almost certainly develop a patina, if not rust, even if I didn’t cut anything wet with it. What’s your experience with this, Marc (or anyone else who has a Maxamet knife)?

    But there was also a guy who made two videos: one in which he compared the edge retention of Maxamet with CPM 10V and one in which he compared that of CMP 10V with S110V. The result of these videos is that Maxamet has about 40% more edge retention than S110V (which has a little less edge retention than CMP 10V). One of the reasons for the inconsistent advice and opinions is probably that these steels are very new and little people have them.

    So I’m still doubting… do I want a stainless knife with (maybe) 40% less edge retention that is relatively tough or a steel with 40% more edge retention that is not stainless and a little less tough/ductile. Any opinions here?

    Here are the videos. First a comparison between Maxamet and CMP 10V in which Maxamet wins by about 36% regarding edge retention.

    Then a comparison by the same guy between CMP 10V and S110V in which CMP 10V wins by a few percent.

    It’s really the only semi-direct comparison between Maxamet and S110V I’ve found, so I don’t know how representative it is. His testing procedure looks ok, though.

    I’m really interested in your opinions! (And if you say: “these steels are so edge resistant that it doesn’t matter much in practice”, you could be right. But there is a psychological aspect, too, in having the most edge resistant steel there is 🙂 ).

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #41181
    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 122
    • Replies: 2933

    I’ve been running an ongoing, non-scientific experiment with my Spyderco Native with Maxamet for the last couple of months. I carried it for a while before sharpening it, using it camping and on a variety of tasks including cutting a mountain of cardboard. Once it got dull enough that it would no longer shave, I did a quick touch-up on the factory edge with the 1500# diamonds. I chose that grit because it most closely resembled the factory edge scratch pattern. I’ve carried since with no other sharpening and took it on a hunting trip the last 5 days (I wasn’t hunting, just accompanying friends that were). It’s now no longer shaving but still cutting almost anything I need pretty easily. I did notice that it wasn’t slicing open plastic packaging quite as easily by the end of the trip. I have mostly been in New Mexico which is arid and some in Colorado which is less arid but still not really humid. It did rain all day during one of the days in the field. I don’t see any patina or rust.

    -Clay

    4 users thanked author for this post.
    #41182
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    Thanks, Clay. That sounds promising!

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.