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Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #37608
    cbwx34
    Participant
    • Topics: 57
    • Replies: 1505

    Reprofile to sharp in…

     

    6 users thanked author for this post.
    #37614
    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 929

    Clay must be working on a new version of the micro adjusts so that you don’t have to break out an Allen wrench. I would be very interested in this upgrade.

     

    #37616
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 61
    • Replies: 2124

    Clay must be working on a new version of the micro adjusts so that you don’t have to break out an Allen wrench. I would be very interested in this upgrade.

    My same observation and interest!

    Clay how do we get those?

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #37617
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    Very nice video. Instructional, too . I made a copy on my blog.

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #37618
    378pete
    Participant
    • Topics: 4
    • Replies: 19

    Clay must be working on a new version of the micro adjusts so that you don’t have to break out an Allen wrench. I would be very interested in this upgrade.

    My same observation and interest! Clay how do we get those?

    Count me in too

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #37619
    Alan
    Participant
    • Topics: 15
    • Replies: 206

    Excellent video.  Those edge-leading, down and away strokes are mostly what I use nowadays.  It just seems to be an easier stroke than the up and away trailing-edge stokes.  Also, the scratches left are better for cutting as the knife is drawn towards you. And less burr to remove.

     

    Alan

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #37643
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 1941

    I keep a chart over my bench that lists each grit with a preferred direction of stroke.  With diamond stones, the stroke at the apex is edge leading while the films are always edge trailing to avoid cutting the film.  If I’m not near the apex, I use scrubbing strokes to cut more quickly.

    Since I try to keep 1000-grit as a “down and away” to produce what is usually the preferred tooth direction, 800, 400 and 100 grit are “down and toward”,  the alternate grits of 600 and 200 are “down and away.”  Films of 15, 6, 1.5 and 0.5 microns are “up and away” while 9, 3, 1.0 and 0.1 microns are “up and toward.”  By sticking to this I can reliably go to the the next grit knowing what scratch patterns I’m looking at.

    5 users thanked author for this post.
    #37817
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 1941

    I too have been impressed by the new micro-adjust Clay demonstrates in that video.  So much so that I took the idea and made a version of my own.  I have really fat fingers and thinking that I wouldn’t like fiddling with the tiny knob between the ball joint and the support block, I extended the micro-adjust out farther and put the adjustment knob out on the end of the screw.   After buying some parts from McMaster-Carr (a bit high at about $50, but I wanted stainless to match the other parts) and about 1.5 hours of work, I came up with the following:

    IMG_0507 compressed IMG_0506 compressed

    The micro-adjust screws are the longest 1/4″-28 set screw (stainless steel) I could find.  I epoxied them into a pair of plain rod-end couplings.

    The knurled knobs at the other end of the screws are unthreaded with set-screws (I filed a small flat near the end of the screws)

    The other knurled flange is made from the same type knob, but threaded, no set screws and I cut off the hubs with a hacksaw, then ground them flat with my belt sander.  It acts as a jam nut, locking the screw by tightening against the support block.

    As you can see, I have plenty of adjustment range.  Obviously, the main benefit is to eliminate the need for a tool.  This gadget can be operated with one hand and works really well!  I’m considering putting some sort of marking system on the knob to help me see better how far I’m actually moving the adjustment.

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #37821
    Snecx
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 56

    Clay, if you’re reading this, with all the small upgrades you did on the Gen 3, now I want one! Is it even available yet?

    The longer rod for “extended range” micro adjustment solves everything about touching up a non-symmetrical bevel. In the video above, the bevel is 21º and 25º-ish. Previously on the Gen 3 I don’t see a way to simultaneously sharpen both sides with such degree of difference.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #37822
    Viking
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 11

    I second these thoughts!

    #37855
    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 122
    • Replies: 2933

    Clay, if you’re reading this, with all the small upgrades you did on the Gen 3, now I want one! Is it even available yet? The longer rod for “extended range” micro adjustment solves everything about touching up a non-symmetrical bevel. In the video above, the bevel is 21º and 25º-ish. Previously on the Gen 3 I don’t see a way to simultaneously sharpen both sides with such degree of difference.

    We’re working on it 

    -Clay

    2 users thanked author for this post.
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