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Small chip near tip . . . Best plan of attack?

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Expidia 12/31/2018 at 11:05 am.

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  • #48829

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 16
    • Replies: 709

    I’m in the same boat on boxes. I’ve been using a utility knife for opening most packages because that tape residue is a real pain to get off of a blade. It makes it more difficult when the blade is extra sharp too because there’s more risk of getting cut as well.

    #48830

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 54
    • Replies: 1501

    Use your knives and enjoy them.  This Goo Gone does a great job removing adhesive residue.  For the worse cases I apply it with a Q-tip or applicator stick, sometimes two or three applications.  I let it sit and soak into the glue residue in-between applications.  The sticky residue usually wipes right off.

    I’ve applied it to paper sticker labels applied and adhered to thin paper boxes similar to a tooth paste or medicine box.  Something really thin that will rip the paper box up when trying to peel the label off.  I apply it to totally soak in and saturate the labels.  After letting it sit for 3 to 5 minutes the labels pull right off.  After you let the Goo Gone dry it wipes clean.  You can’t tell that a label was once applied to the package.  It’s a really good product to keep in the house.  It works great to remove those price stickers retail stores apply that break into pieces and tear up when you try to peel them off.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #48832

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1692

    I keep a spritz bottle of lacquer thinner handy for just those sort of problems.

    Incidentally, lacquer thinner is the best thing I’ve found for removing magic marker (Sharpie) ink.  It literally floats away as the thinner rolls across it.  You gotta watch out though, it doesn’t like most plastics, including WE handles.  There, I use alcohol.  For which I also have a spritz bottle, but of a different color.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #48838

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 31
    • Replies: 174

    Yep, same here.  I have to start using my utility knife too as I’ve cut myself using a single edge by the blade slipping a little bit when slicing cardboard.

    My town dropped off the big blue trash containers on wheels.  Now we are required to fold or cut the cardboard to fit inside.  Used to be we could just the stack empty boxes at the curb.  So I’m doing a lot more cutting as my neighbor downstairs shares the same recycle container.

    #48840

    NotSharpEnuff
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 30

    Expedia,

    Below is one of my posts on the BESS exchange concerning test numbers.  The thread started because a user posted a Youtube video with a 5gf reading.

    http://bessex.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=364

    I agree that any “slicing” component will skew the test.  Most times I freehand rather than use the fulcrum because it limits the area that I can test and can add “slicing” based on the blade shape and length.

    In my experience using the PT50A tester freehand, I found that you have to be really careful not to move the blade horizontally or contact the media with the knife at an angle.  Instead of true push cutting I add a slicing component to the test.

    I have to be super slow contacting the media, with the edge even on the horizontal plane, or my readings are misleadingly lower.

    Like EOU, I would have liked to see the fulcrum used.

    Ed K.

    I bought my LASER goniometer from CATRA in the United Kingdom.  The cheapest one they sold at the time was the Hobbigoni and it was around $200.

     

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    #48844

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 31
    • Replies: 174

    Yes, Ed I got away from using the fulcrum as it was allowing me to slice and the weight of my hands anywhere on the base kept causing me to reset the window back to 0.

    Now I hold the knife with two hands and press straight down. Nice part is I can rest both hands on the table to each side of the Bess for steadiness and repeat ability and I don’t keep setting off the numbers from the weight of my hand on the fulcrum.  Best edge number I’ve gotten was 115 with CRK CPM S35VM.  When I drop below 100 I know I’m slicing ever so slightly.  Do you sharpen as a business?

    You are correct on the $200 for CATRA laser thats what I was finding a few months ago.  I’d like to find one used.  If you come across one please PM me!

    #48847

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 31
    • Replies: 174

    Ed I just priced your unit.  Why would I be paying 20% tax when I’m not in the UK ?  What do you calculate this out to be in dollars?

    https://www.catra.org.uk/shoppingcart.asp

    #48853

    NotSharpEnuff
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 30

    Expedia,

    I am registered in TX as an LLC.  If you define a business as working and not charging for services I indeed have a business!  I read a book quite awhile ago about the 10000 hour rule to become expert at a task/sport/endeavor.  Had to look it up – Outliers by Malcom Gladwell.  Anyway, that stuck with me and I look at every knife that I sharpen as an opportunity to build my skill set.  They get a sharp edge and I get the experience of hundreds of knives of different shapes/styles/steel.  Right now I have a full time job that pays the rent –  my dabbling in sharpening is a passion for sure but still a hobby.  The quote below kind of sums up my thinking on doing stuff.

    PS. I get the coaching and expert feedback from this site as well as a few others.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Practice_(learning_method)#Deliberate_practice

    Psychologist K. Anders Ericsson, a professor of Psychology at Florida State University, has been a pioneer in researching deliberate practice and what it means. According to Ericsson:

    People believe that because expert performance is qualitatively different from a normal performance the expert performer must be endowed with characteristics qualitatively different from those of normal adults. […] We agree that expert performance is qualitatively different from normal performance and even that expert performers have characteristics and abilities that are qualitatively different from or at least outside the range of those of normal adults. However, we deny that these differences are immutable, that is, due to innate talent. Only a few exceptions, most notably height, are genetically prescribed. Instead, we argue that the differences between expert performers and normal adults reflect a life-long period of deliberate effort to improve performance in a specific domain.<sup id=”cite_ref-:0_3-0″ class=”reference”>[3]</sup>

    One of Ericsson’s core findings is that how expert one becomes at a skill has more to do with how one practices than with merely performing a skill a large number of times. An expert breaks down the skills that are required to be expert and focuses on improving those skill chunks during practice or day-to-day activities, often paired with immediate coaching feedback. Another important feature of deliberate practice lies in continually practicing a skill at more challenging levels with the intention of mastering it.<sup id=”cite_ref-Mayer,_R._E._2008_4-0″ class=”reference”>[4]</sup> Deliberate practice is also discussed in the books Talent is Overrated by Geoff Colvin<sup id=”cite_ref-5″ class=”reference”>[5]</sup> and The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle,<sup id=”cite_ref-6″ class=”reference”>[6]</sup> among others. This includes, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, by Angela Duckworth<sup id=”cite_ref-:1_7-0″ class=”reference”>[7]</sup> and Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell.<sup id=”cite_ref-8″ class=”reference”>[8]</sup>

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    #48863

    NotSharpEnuff
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 30

    Expedia,

    When you fill out the payment form for the Hobbigoni with a U.S. address they drop the VAT and add a shipping charge.

    I just noticed they offer a left hand version.  I must of missed that when I ordered mine.  I thought it was awkward where they located the on button.

    If you are interested in a right hand model PM me.

    Ed K.

    Attachments:
    #48868

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 31
    • Replies: 174

    Yes, Ed I sent you a private message.

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