Advanced Search

SM-100

Recent Forums Main Forum SM-100

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  tcmeyer 09/12/2019 at 3:05 am.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #51919

    Jon J
    Participant
    • Topics: 6
    • Replies: 6

    Hey guys, I have a Ferrum Forge Stinger I bought new about 2 1/2 years ago. It’s blade steel is SM-100. I guess I shouldn’t call it steal really, from what I’ve read about it. But I was wondering if anyone has ever tried sharpening this stuff. I have it in my vise and have started to find the sweet spot and then it popped in my mind, that this stuff is harder than anything I have ever heard of and might want to check on here with guys and see if has any advice. I mean, nasa tried squashing it with their press made to squash bearings, which supposedly tops out at 2,000,000 pounds and they couldn’t hurt the SM-100 bearing. Also, it doesn’t have any metal in it. A magnet has no attraction to it what so ever. So, will my WE stones be able to put an edge on this thing, or will it ruin my stones trying? Let me know if anyone has any experience with this stuff or has any thoughts on it.

     

     

    #51920

    NotSharpEnuff
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 71

    Jon J,

    First time I’ve heard of this alloy and have not had a chance to sharpen it.  I went to http://zknives.com/knives/steels/sm-100.shtml to look it up.  Zknives is a fairly good reference for different blade steels – but buyer beware – it’s one persons opinion.

    Ed K.

     

    SM-100(Summit Materials) – Variation of the Crucieble NiTiNol 60 alloy. Composition was tweaked to improve manufacturing process, but exact numbers have not been published yet. Promotional materials refer to NASA tests and mention twice the life expectancy compared to AISI 440C, although the tests were done for bearings, not knives. Not sure why, but even Summit Materials own web page cites two different working hardness ranges 56-62HRC on the materials page and 57-64HRC on the home page. 2 HRC especially when we’retalking about 62 vs. 64HRC can translate into huge difference in edge holding, edge thickness etc. I’m trying to get more precise data. NiTiNOL knives are speced at 65HRC. Another point to consider, alloy has very low Young’s modulus value 47-90 vs 200 and above on more conventional steels. Can’t tell without testing an actual knife, but low Young’s modulus could affect edge stability and strength negatively. In other words edges might require extra thickness to sustain themselves, which would definitely be a negative. Other Titanium and Cobalt alloys such as Talonite and Stelitte 6BStelitte 6K have the same problem with thick edges. Keep in mind, this is purely a guess, based on a particular property.

    Manufacturing Technology – CPM

    Country – United States(US)

    Added the NitiNol 60 entry as well.

    60 NiTiNOL PM(Crucible) – Crucible CPM alloy, 60% Nickel, 40% Titanium. Discovered in late 1950s, by US naval ordinance lab, which is why we have NOL in the alloy name. Has many potential uses, however manufacturing process is very complicated and expensive. Obviously, very expensive blade material. So far only one maker uses it. Hardness up to 65HRC. High wear resistance, corrosion proof. Variation of the NiTiNOL appeared recently, SM-100 by Summit Materials, LLC.

    Manufacturing Technology – CPM

    Country – United States(US)

    Known Aliases:
    Crucible – NiTiNOL60Crucible – NiTiNOL

     

    ttp://zknives.com/knives/steels/sm-100.shtml

    4 users thanked author for this post.
    #51925

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 851

    I had never heard of this material either. It should be okay to sharpen with the diamond stones since there is no way this stuff is harder than the diamonds.

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #51940

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1835

    I agree that diamond stones should be able to sharpen anything, and Rockwell numbers in the 65 range ought not to be a problem.  My ZDP-189 Spydies should be at about Rc64 and I’ve had no problems sharpening them.  Carbide tooling can be sharpened with diamond stones too, but one must take care not to apply too much pressure.  When the diamond particles are under high lateral loads, the nickel plating attaching them to the substrate could fail.

    #51942

    Jon J
    Participant
    • Topics: 6
    • Replies: 6

    I talked with the maker of the knife, Ferrum Forge, which is 2 brothers, 1 of whom is extremely knowledgeable about this material and he suggested that I send it in to their recommended sharpener, but I’ve got a WICKED EDGE and that’s not about to happen. So he said to make sure and keep the stones clean, cause they will fill up quite quickly with the SM-100 material.

    Also, if you know nothing of this material, you might look it up, pretty wild. I remember before I bought this knife, I read on the Ferrum Forge website about all the troubles they had with making the blades. It’s pretty unbelievable stuff.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #51984

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1835

    So he said to make sure and keep the stones clean, cause they will fill up quite quickly with the SM-100 material.

    Having had a very little bit of exposure to titanium, I can imagine that it would tend to plug up abrasives pretty rapidly, much like aluminum.  A trick I was taught by an old machinist is to rub chalk on a file to prevent aluminum from plugging up the teeth.

    That said, I wouldn’t expect a hardened version of the material to act the same, but here we have someone with experience contradicting that idea.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.