Advanced Search

Re: the new 2200/3000 stones?

Recent Forums Main Forum Techniques and Sharpening Strategies Abrasives Re: the new 2200/3000 stones?

This topic contains 37 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Brewbear 07/04/2019 at 10:17 am.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #50734

    airscapes
    Participant
    • Topics: 9
    • Replies: 141

    Clay should offer a service where you could send your stones into WE and they could suggest how worn down they are. Or maybe post pics on their grit charts of stones in various stages of wearing down and the point where they need to be replenished that we could gauge with a 10x loupe.

    Such a service would be silly when all you really need is a  USB microscope that will allow you to see and document your results.    A 10x loop is insufficient for the task of monitoring you progress between grits  in my opinion.  I used a 30x before dropping $35 for the scope and there is no comparison on what you can see when you are using +200x magnification and can save the images.  You can also monitor your stone surface to determine when they need to be replace.    Good luck with your new toys!

    #50735

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 39
    • Replies: 270

    I have a digital microscope.  Its great for getting down deep and analyzing an edge during various stages.  It takes pics of the edge too!  I mostly use a lighted 10x $7 loupe.  All I need to use it for is to quickly scan along the edge to see if I’ve erased all the scratch marks from the previous grit before moving on.  I can do this also with my naked eye and I don’t even have great eyesight.

    My edge sharpening needs are pretty basic.

    I also have a 30x loupe, but I found the higher the power the smaller the field of vision is with the loupe.

    On the 100’s that I may have to replace. . . . I’ll check them through the digital microscope but since they are already worn I have nothing to compare how the new ones come.  All I know is my 100’s take twice the time to get a burr as they used to and I don’t want to spend yet another $70 to find I was wrong and they still have a lot of life left in them.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #50736

    airscapes
    Participant
    • Topics: 9
    • Replies: 141

    I have a digital microscope. Its great for getting down deep and analyzing an edge during various stages. It takes pics of the edge too! I mostly use a lighted 10x $7 loupe. All I need to use it for is to quickly scan along the edge to see if I’ve erased all the scratch marks from the previous grit before moving on. I can do this also with my naked eye and I don’t even have great eyesight. My edge sharpening needs are pretty basic. I also have a 30x loupe, but I found the higher the power the smaller the field of vision is with the loupe. On the 100’s that I may have to replace. . . . I’ll check them through the digital microscope but since they are already worn I have nothing to compare how the new ones come. All I know is my 100’s take twice the time to get a burr as they used to and I don’t want to spend yet another $70 to find I was wrong and they still have a lot of life left in them.

    Wow!  You must have Superman eyes cause there is no way in hell you can see the previous scratches compared to the current with a loop.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  airscapes.
    #50738

    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 55

    I have a digital microscope. Its great for getting down deep and analyzing an edge during various stages. It takes pics of the edge too! I mostly use a lighted 10x $7 loupe. All I need to use it for is to quickly scan along the edge to see if I’ve erased all the scratch marks from the previous grit before moving on. I can do this also with my naked eye and I don’t even have great eyesight. My edge sharpening needs are pretty basic. I also have a 30x loupe, but I found the higher the power the smaller the field of vision is with the loupe. On the 100’s that I may have to replace. . . . I’ll check them through the digital microscope but since they are already worn I have nothing to compare how the new ones come. All I know is my 100’s take twice the time to get a burr as they used to and I don’t want to spend yet another $70 to find I was wrong and they still have a lot of life left in them.

    A question and a suggestion :

    Q: which microscope did you decide on? I seem to remember you having a wifi/usb type you liked in the beginning but became disenchanted with.

    S: Did you clean the 100 grit stones? They tend to get a lot of buildup (I’m too new at this so I haven’t experienced it yet but other members here were talking about it)

    #50739

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 39
    • Replies: 270

    To Organics comment about the packing slip with the new ceramics:

    Its good they sent it.  I’ve read threads on other sites where they use a spritz of water from a sprayer before using.  Clearly, this is not good for the WE ceramics.

    I did my first knife earlier.  The utility knife that I made from grinding away the serrations.  I’m liking the feel of the 2200/3000 after the 1500>the 1.4/0.6 then stropped with the .50/.25 diamond spray.

    I was more interested in just getting started on the break in period than how sharp an edge I was getting.  2200/3000 started out very grindy and then smoothed out after about 30 strokes.  I figure it was the loose stones sluffing off when new.

    A few more beaters and then I’ll start focusing on bevel clarity and edge sharpness.

    #50740

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 39
    • Replies: 270

    I have a digital microscope. Its great for getting down deep and analyzing an edge during various stages. It takes pics of the edge too! I mostly use a lighted 10x $7 loupe. All I need to use it for is to quickly scan along the edge to see if I’ve erased all the scratch marks from the previous grit before moving on. I can do this also with my naked eye and I don’t even have great eyesight. My edge sharpening needs are pretty basic. I also have a 30x loupe, but I found the higher the power the smaller the field of vision is with the loupe. On the 100’s that I may have to replace. . . . I’ll check them through the digital microscope but since they are already worn I have nothing to compare how the new ones come. All I know is my 100’s take twice the time to get a burr as they used to and I don’t want to spend yet another $70 to find I was wrong and they still have a lot of life left in them.

    A question and a suggestion : Q: which microscope did you decide on? I seem to remember you having a wifi/usb type you liked in the beginning but became disenchanted with. S: Did you clean the 100 grit stones? They tend to get a lot of buildup (I’m too new at this so I haven’t experienced it yet but other members here were talking about it)

    Yes I tried a $99 scope off Amazon for a few weeks.  It was not of a $99 build quality IMO so I returned it for this one which works great and a bargain for $34.95.  I don’t use the stand as I just run the scope along the blade when I want a closer look.  Using the scope might even save one from slicing off the end of your nose when using a loup :o):  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XNYXQHE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Good idea on cleaning the stones.  I know wiping the DLF’s with a paper towel dipped in alcohol makes them look new again.  For the stones I usually just brush them off over a barrel with a toothbrush after each use.

    An office mate of mine got his set a few months before I did.  We sharpen the same types of folders, but he’s also a hunter so he sharpens many more knives than I do and he might have even bought his system used.  He was complaining a few months ago that it took a long time to raise a burr with his 100’s so I lent him mine to try and he said that was the issue his stones were worn down so he ordered another set of 100’s.  Thats why I’m thinking mine are wearing down and it could be time to replenise them. I can’t imagine how long it would take me to raise a burr starting with the 200’s on supersteels that some say they use the 200’s to reprofile.

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #50743

    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 55

    I have a digital microscope. Its great for getting down deep and analyzing an edge during various stages. It takes pics of the edge too! I mostly use a lighted 10x $7 loupe. All I need to use it for is to quickly scan along the edge to see if I’ve erased all the scratch marks from the previous grit before moving on. I can do this also with my naked eye and I don’t even have great eyesight. My edge sharpening needs are pretty basic. I also have a 30x loupe, but I found the higher the power the smaller the field of vision is with the loupe. On the 100’s that I may have to replace. . . . I’ll check them through the digital microscope but since they are already worn I have nothing to compare how the new ones come. All I know is my 100’s take twice the time to get a burr as they used to and I don’t want to spend yet another $70 to find I was wrong and they still have a lot of life left in them.

    A question and a suggestion : Q: which microscope did you decide on? I seem to remember you having a wifi/usb type you liked in the beginning but became disenchanted with. S: Did you clean the 100 grit stones? They tend to get a lot of buildup (I’m too new at this so I haven’t experienced it yet but other members here were talking about it)

    Yes I tried a $99 scope off Amazon for a few weeks. It was not of a $99 build quality IMO so I returned it for this one which works great and a bargain for $34.95. I don’t use the stand as I just run the scope along the blade when I want a closer look. Using the scope might even save one from slicing off the end of your nose when using a loup :o): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XNYXQHE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Good idea on cleaning the stones. I know wiping the DLF’s with a paper towel dipped in alcohol makes them look new again. For the stones I usually just brush them off over a barrel with a toothbrush after each use. An office mate of mine got his set a few months before I did. We sharpen the same types of folders, but he’s also a hunter so he sharpens many more knives than I do and he might have even bought his system used. He was complaining a few months ago that it took a long time to raise a burr with his 100’s so I lent him mine to try and he said that was the issue his stones were worn down so he ordered another set of 100’s. Thats why I’m thinking mine are wearing down and it could be time to replenise them. I can’t imagine how long it would take me to raise a burr starting with the 200’s on supersteels that some say they use the 200’s to reprofile.

    I’ve read in several threads that some of the members here use a toothbrush and alcohol to clean the stones, I admit I haven’t doe that yet but I don’t sharpen many blades (as of now)

    #50744

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 39
    • Replies: 270

    I have a digital microscope. Its great for getting down deep and analyzing an edge during various stages. It takes pics of the edge too! I mostly use a lighted 10x $7 loupe. All I need to use it for is to quickly scan along the edge to see if I’ve erased all the scratch marks from the previous grit before moving on. I can do this also with my naked eye and I don’t even have great eyesight. My edge sharpening needs are pretty basic. I also have a 30x loupe, but I found the higher the power the smaller the field of vision is with the loupe. On the 100’s that I may have to replace. . . . I’ll check them through the digital microscope but since they are already worn I have nothing to compare how the new ones come. All I know is my 100’s take twice the time to get a burr as they used to and I don’t want to spend yet another $70 to find I was wrong and they still have a lot of life left in them.

    A question and a suggestion : Q: which microscope did you decide on? I seem to remember you having a wifi/usb type you liked in the beginning but became disenchanted with. S: Did you clean the 100 grit stones? They tend to get a lot of buildup (I’m too new at this so I haven’t experienced it yet but other members here were talking about it)

    I also have a clamp on light just above the WE setup.  The scratches reflect this light making it easier to see with my naked eye with the coarser grits.  As I get down to the finer grits, I use the 10x lightd loupe but that gets even harder to use when lighted once the edges are mirrored as it reflects the light back like a mirror would.

    BTW the lighted 30x loupe makes removing splinters in your skin “a breeze”.

    Attachments:
    #50745

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 39
    • Replies: 270

    I have a digital microscope. Its great for getting down deep and analyzing an edge during various stages. It takes pics of the edge too! I mostly use a lighted 10x $7 loupe. All I need to use it for is to quickly scan along the edge to see if I’ve erased all the scratch marks from the previous grit before moving on. I can do this also with my naked eye and I don’t even have great eyesight. My edge sharpening needs are pretty basic. I also have a 30x loupe, but I found the higher the power the smaller the field of vision is with the loupe. On the 100’s that I may have to replace. . . . I’ll check them through the digital microscope but since they are already worn I have nothing to compare how the new ones come. All I know is my 100’s take twice the time to get a burr as they used to and I don’t want to spend yet another $70 to find I was wrong and they still have a lot of life left in them.

    A question and a suggestion : Q: which microscope did you decide on? I seem to remember you having a wifi/usb type you liked in the beginning but became disenchanted with. S: Did you clean the 100 grit stones? They tend to get a lot of buildup (I’m too new at this so I haven’t experienced it yet but other members here were talking about it)

    Yes I tried a $99 scope off Amazon for a few weeks. It was not of a $99 build quality IMO so I returned it for this one which works great and a bargain for $34.95. I don’t use the stand as I just run the scope along the blade when I want a closer look. Using the scope might even save one from slicing off the end of your nose when using a loup :o): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XNYXQHE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Good idea on cleaning the stones. I know wiping the DLF’s with a paper towel dipped in alcohol makes them look new again. For the stones I usually just brush them off over a barrel with a toothbrush after each use. An office mate of mine got his set a few months before I did. We sharpen the same types of folders, but he’s also a hunter so he sharpens many more knives than I do and he might have even bought his system used. He was complaining a few months ago that it took a long time to raise a burr with his 100’s so I lent him mine to try and he said that was the issue his stones were worn down so he ordered another set of 100’s. Thats why I’m thinking mine are wearing down and it could be time to replenise them. I can’t imagine how long it would take me to raise a burr starting with the 200’s on supersteels that some say they use the 200’s to reprofile.

    I’ve read in several threads that some of the members here use a toothbrush and alcohol to clean the stones, I admit I haven’t doe that yet but I don’t sharpen many blades (as of now)

    I’ll try a google search that will turn up how to clean your WE stones.  There is probably a Youtube vid on it alrady.

    #50752

    SteveG
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 3

    Does anyone know the micron sizes on the  2200/3000 stones?

    I used mine for the first time last night, and so far I like how they worked.  Need to see how they do after they’ve broken in, but I go to the superfine ceramics and then hand strop after the 1500, so used these in place of the ceramics.  The edge is toothier, but nearly as sharp on a push cut.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #50762

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 39
    • Replies: 270

    Ya, I know what you mean.  I was  looking for that same info myself.  WE can put the 2200/3000 up for sale on their site but they can’t update their grit/micron chart…. boggles the mind: https://support.wickededgeusa.com/portal/kb/articles/grit-comparison-table

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #50778

    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 55

    Ya, I know what you mean. I was looking for that same info myself. WE can put the 2200/3000 up for sale on their site but they can’t update their grit/micron chart…. boggles the mind: https://support.wickededgeusa.com/portal/kb/articles/grit-comparison-table%5B/quote%5D
    I’m waiting for Clay to chime in since he has the most experience with the new stones. I had to close my eyes twice before ordering them, it would be nice to know a bit more and make a more informed purchase.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #50781

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1779

    Alas. I’m just getting around to trying the new stones.  Mine are actually quite pristine, with the first inspection resulting in a very positive impression.

    I approach the grit combinations from a slightly different perspective, as I remounted my stones in a different sequence, running 200/400, 600/800, 1000/1500.  My rule of thumb has been that the steps in grit should be somewhere between 50% and 100%.  In other words, the next step up from 1000 grit should be somewhere between 1500 and 2000 grit.   While the WE grits tend to be on the low side of the step increases, I would have chosen to go straight to 3000 grit from 1500.  I plan to test my “theory” after I’ve got the new stones broken in.

    Sorry for not getting around to this sooner, but I had earlier picked up a collection of eleven old wood planes on Craigslist and have be working my way through a restoration program.  Some really interesting learnings on sharpening really old blades.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by  tcmeyer.
    4 users thanked author for this post.
    #50783

    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 39
    • Replies: 270

    Maybe thats why they also sell the 3000 with a glass platen on the other side, so one can go right to a DLP. I have not used them on a start from a profiled edge yet.  The two edges I’ve done so far with my new 2200/3000 and the MF ceramics already had mirrored bevels and were already apexed.

    #50851

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
    • Replies: 2894

    These new stones do introduce some complexity in figuring out a good grit progression and it’s impossible to create a one-size-fits-all answer because of the variety of different abrasives people already have in their collections. Another issue in recommending progressions is that the answer depends on your goals:

    • Maximum polish
    • Maximum sharpness
    • Fastest/most efficient route in time and money with focus on sharpness
    • Fastest/most efficient route in time and money with focus on polish

    I’ve been enjoying the following progression for maximum sharpness:

    1000#> 1500#> 2200#> 3000#> 0.6 Micro-Fine> 1.0 diamond emulsion on leather strop

    For my EDC, I’ve been doing the following:

    1000#> 1500#> 2200#> 3000#. I like this progression because the 3000# finish is plenty aggressive but still refined and seems to hold up well. I recently applied this finish to my EDC with the new DRO handles for convex edges that we introduced at Blade Show and I really liked the way that edge performed, all the way up until I used the knife the stab into and slash 6 bags of concrete. The aggregate in the bags really trashed my edge 🙂 Another reason I like the 3000# for my EDC is that it’s easy to touch it back up with just a few strokes on those stones.

    I’ve been enjoying the following progression for maximum polish (to the naked eye):

    1000#> 1500#> 2200#> 3000#> 3.0 micron diamond lapping film> 2.0 micron emulsion on leather strop

    If you already have the Superfine 1200/1600 ceramics, you can fit those in between your 1000# diamond stones and the 2200# diamond stones.

    At tcmeyer pointed out, you can definitely skip some steps because there is so much overlap. For example, going from the 1500# to the 3000# will work fine, as will going from the 1000# to the 2200#. You’ll spend more time with the higher grit to remove the scratches from the previous stones, but it doesn’t require an unreasonable effort.

    -Clay

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.