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posted few years back – fyi

Recent Forums Main Forum Sharpening as a Business posted few years back – fyi

This topic contains 17 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  tcmeyer 04/07/2017 at 12:55 am.

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  • #38148

    tuffy braithwaite
    Participant
    • Topics: 184
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    i put hundreds of these on outside edge of our sharpening table at all gun shows we work  –  they really generate a lot of attention and conversation

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    #38150

    Mark76
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    Hahah, Ive got them lying throught the whole house, but particularly in the kitchen (=workspace) and bathroom. I can imagine they work at shows.

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    #38151

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1835

    I almost detached the entire pad of the end of my middle finger, right hand tonight;  I’m a lefty.  Sharp knife (what else?) and trying to bisect the last 1/4″ of a stick of hard summer sausage.  Surprisingly, there was very little pain, but lots of blood (clopedogril).  The elastic fabric band-aid did the trick.  Nice and tight.  First time it’s happened at the cutting board.  Two Manhattans.  Go figure.

    #38152

    Mark76
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 179
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    Luckily you didn’t have to go to the first aid. All the best!

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    #38154

    M1rrorEdge
    Participant
    • Topics: 8
    • Replies: 222

    I love this idea and the lasting effect on your customers is priceless.  I bet they will always remember it.

    Eddie Kinlen
    M1rror Edge Sharpening Service, LLC
    +1(682)777-1622

    #38168

    dulledge
    Participant
    • Topics: 11
    • Replies: 180

    Great idea! 🙂 Many times I saw a slogan that “sharp knife is safer than dull knife”. Not from my experience.

    How do you stop bleeding? Band aid seems to help only after bleeding stopped. It only covers the wound from contamination.

    #38169

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 854

    Although I have not personally done it, many people have used super glue to close a cut. A little reading on wikipedia informs me that regular super glue is not FDA approved for this application because it can cause some skin irritation, but a very closely related fast-setting adhesive by the name Dermabond is approved for closure of cuts and this addressed the skin irritation issue.

    #38174

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1835

    Great idea!  Many times I saw a slogan that “sharp knife is safer than dull knife”. Not from my experience. How do you stop bleeding? Band aid seems to help only after bleeding stopped. It only covers the wound from contamination.

    Stopping the bleeding is the main problem I have, since I’m on a blood thinner.  The cut I’m dealing with now was a pretty good leaker, so I wrapped a flexible Band-Aid rather tightly for the first day.  After that, you’re pretty good with regular Band-Aid changes.  If it’s not not near the tip of a finger, I like the new “advanced healing” bandages, which are water-proof and stay on for 3-4 days, after which things are pretty well healed up.

    If you are in a situation where you’ve truly done some serious damage to yourself and are losing substantial amounts of that red liquid, you would do well to have one of those first-aid packs they use to stop hemorrhaging on the battlefield.  I visited the local Gander Mountain store here last week, and they had ’em in their camping section, so I’m sure they’re also on the ‘net.

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    #38175

    M1rrorEdge
    Participant
    • Topics: 8
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    “sharp knife is safer than dull knife”.

    It’s funny you said that, I just read this statement in U.S. government policy and thought to share it.   The “Sharp knife is safer than a dull knife” isn’t a “Slogan” it’s actually a O.S.H.A standard  for tools that are supposed to be sharp (OSHA3080-See Attachment if  the Web Admin lets me).  Straight off the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (O.S.H.A.) website (In the U.S.).   I don’t think most restaurants, barbers, or salons in the U.S. have considered this (Enjoy).

    OSHA-Publicaiton

     

    Eddie Kinlen
    M1rror Edge Sharpening Service, LLC
    +1(682)777-1622

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    #38185

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
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    I think the basis of thought behind the “sharp knife is safer than dull knife” rule lies in the fact that a sharp knife usually requires very little force to cut the material at hand.  Requiring much more force, a dull knife could slip and produce an injury.

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    #38186

    dulledge
    Participant
    • Topics: 11
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    Maybe sharp knives are safer in professional environment. Professional cooks and meat processors have different techique.

    For lousy home users like me it is a different story. Once we rented a big vacation house with large group of friends for skiing vacation. Of course I sharpened knives at the kitchen there. And although I warned everybody several times that knives are very sharp, everyone cut themselves during 4 days of our trip.

    #38187

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1858

    And although I warned everybody several times that knives are very sharp, everyone cut themselves during 4 days of our trip.

    Just they’re way of acknowledging a sharpening job well done.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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    #38191

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
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    QuikClot and other coagulants work great. I keep a bunch around the shop and we take it to shows and I keep it in my first aid kit in my backpack. Once I get the bleeding to stop, I like the hydrocolloid bandages that Tom is describing.

    -Clay

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    #38192

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
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    I have used the skin glues quite a bit for little nicks that don’t bleed much and their great for keeping a low profile and keeping the wound closed and protected from dirt.

    -Clay

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    #38193

    dulledge
    Participant
    • Topics: 11
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    QuikClot and other coagulants work great.

    Thank you for your tip! I started to look for it on Amazon and found another couple of interesting things:

    Curad Quickstop Instant Clotting Technology Flex-Fabric Bandages, Assorted Size, 30 Count

    Curad Bloodstop Hemostatic Gauze, 1 X 1 Inches, 10 Count

    They are compact and I guess they would be better for small cuts. These pads are thicker and have blood stopping ingredients. There are a bunch of other blood stopping products that I never knew they existed. Thanks again! 

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