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This topic contains 14 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  airscapes 04/30/2019 at 11:29 am.

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  • #50169

    Mike
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 11

    New user here.  I have a WE 130 with additional 800/1000 and 1500 grit diamond stones, plus 5/3.5 diamond pastes.  I’ve read a ton of postings, and watched another ton of videos. I’m being honest when I say that I’ve made most of the rookie mistakes while trying to learn good techniques.  So far, I’ve sharpened a dozen knifes breaking in my diamond stones, and most of the time, achieved a good edge.  One thing that I seem to be consistently doing is that the bevel on the right side of the knife is a little wider than the bevel on the left side.  I’m very happy with the system, but learned the hard way that I need some sort of “stop” to keep the stones above the side of the knife that I am sharpening.  I currently have been using painters tape on the sides of the knife.  I haven’t been able to find any stops, so any information of where to get them would be greatly appreciated.

    Mike

     

    #50170

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1855

    Mike, anything you can find at your hardware store that will slide down onto your guide rods but stay in place are stone stops.  I found rubber washers at Home Depot on the plumbing aisle in a faucet repair kit.  Cheap and effective.

    Are you right handed? My right dominant side with more coordination, efficiency and strength, yielded taller bevels when I was first learning my technique.  It was just easier for me to do a better job with my right hand then my left hand.  This was exhibited by a taller, better formed and cleaner bevel then my left hand bevels.  It took a conscious effort and attention to detail to tone down my right hand and tune up my left hand to balance out the results.  It took me practice, practice, practice with constant attention.

    I found working each side bevel independently/separately from the other bevel helped me pay the attention I needed.  It also let me control the results by limiting, or extending the time I worked on each side.  That way my right side didn’t run away on me.  I learned to keep closer watch on my bevel progress to balance out the results as I was at it.  Before I discovered it at the end.

    After I get my bevels even and well formed working them one side at a time.  I then work both bevels alternatingly, left-right-left-right to bring the apex together.  Then I move up a grit and start over again.  Back to one side at a time.

    Pressure was key.  I curbed my right hand pressure and learned to lighten it up while improving the efficiency and effectiveness of my left hand pressure and technique.  Now I constantly inspect my progress.  That way I can give more effort to where it’s needed.  The bottom line is it’s comes with experience gained with time spent sharpening and attention to detail.

     

     

     

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    5 users thanked author for this post.
    #50171

    Mike
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 11

    Thanks Marc.  Actually, I’m left handed, but like most left handed people, to an extent, I’m comfortable using both hands.  I did get a rubber o ring from my big box store, but it slid down.  I’ll take another look and see if I can come up with a different idea for a stop.  Somewhere I read to drill a hole in a wine bottle cork.

    #50172

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1855

    Mike , it may work the opposite for you.  Maybe you have more control with your left hand side and right hand side pushes heavy.  Either way, by paying closer attention to your progress all along the way you’ll be able to balance out or better maintain your bevel heights before you get done with the sharpening process.  I never asked this simple question, are you using a digital angle device to set your guide rods angles so you know they are equal, side to side?

    Here’s the sort of sink washers I use for stone stops.   The first ones I bought were a little too tight.  I enlarged the bore a little with a drill bit run through the washer I held with a pliers.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    #50176

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1834

    I had a length of 3/4″ UHMW plastic rod, which I cut into two sets of 5mm, 10mm, 15mm, and 25mm sections.  I then drilled center holes in them with a 17/64″ drill bit.  The set lets me stack up any combination from 5mm to 55mm.  No reason you couldn’t make it out of a wood dowel, and it doesn’t have to be 3/4″ diameter and the holes don’t need to be perfectly centered.

    • This reply was modified 5 months ago by  tcmeyer.
    #50178

    Mike
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 11

    Marc, I do use a digital angle cube to make sure my angles are correct. I also bought a jewelers loupe and a usb microscope from recommendations from the forum.  I’m learning what to look at with the loupe, but I haven’t messed with the microscope much yet, I know that the microscope will be safer to use.  I’ll take both yours and TC’s suggestions the next time I go to a big box store to look for some stone stops.  Thanks again.

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #50280

    Haffner
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 29

    Anything you can find at your hardware store that will slide down onto your guide rods but stay in place are stone stops.

    Indeed, but let me recommend you to use clamping shaft collars as paddle stops. Once you secure the collars on the guide rods, they will stay in place, even when you hit them multiple times while moving the paddles.

    However, do avoid collars with set screws as they might damage your guide rods.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by  Haffner.
    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by  Haffner.
    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #50282

    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 6
    • Replies: 77

    I found these https://www.mcmaster.com/shaft-collars but I’m stuck because I can’t find the rods diameter anywhere. I have the WE130 and I bought the 12 inch rods for it.

    #50283

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1855

    The guide rods are just wider then 1/4″ and 5/16″ is way too large.  I just measured a rod at 33/128″ in fractional inches or 0.2555″ in decimal inches.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #50284

    Haffner
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 29

    I found these https://www.mcmaster.com/shaft-collars but I’m stuck because I can’t find the rods diameter anywhere. I have the WE130 and I bought the 12 inch rods for it.

    Get the “Threaded Shaft Collars”, and buy four of them.

    When you have the 12 inch rods, it’s often a good idea to use clamps on both ends of the rods.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #50285

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1834

    I bought the aluminum two-piece collars from Amazon: Climax Metal 2C-025-A Aluminum Two-Piece Clamping Collar, 1/4″ Bore Size, 11/16″ OD, With 4-40 x 3/8 Set Screw and they work just fine.  I have rods that measure 0.257″.  They’re a little under-sized, but in this application,they don’t have to fit perfectly.
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    6 users thanked author for this post.
    #50286

    Mike
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 11

    Thanks TC, I ordered a pair of the collars.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #50330

    Richard
    Participant
    • Topics: 7
    • Replies: 100

    Welcome Mike!  New user here as well, these are a great group of guys and they’ve helped me as well to figure out all of my shortcomings.

    #50341

    Roy
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 5

    Could you guys elaborate more on how these stop collars will help the overall sharpening process?

    #50343

    airscapes
    Participant
    • Topics: 10
    • Replies: 183

    Roy, it all depends on how long your rods are.  Some folks have 10-12 and 15″ long guide rods.  Not sure what you have on the 130.   With the shorter rods, a collar or stone stop if you  will, placed at the bottom of the rod when sharpening a taller knife will keep the top of the stone from dropping below the bevel of the knife.  If it is allowed to drop you may scratch parts of the knife you do not wish to scratch or damage the bevel with the rod.  With the long extended rods a second set put above the stones does the same thing only this set keeps the stone from going to high and coming up off the bevel of the knife.

     

    4 users thanked author for this post.
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