Advanced Search

New system

Recent Forums Main Forum Getting Started New system

This topic contains 32 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  MarcH 09/15/2019 at 11:07 am.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 33 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #52066

    -Terry
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15

    Sure, it all depends on what techniques you use and what your goals are. After I achieve a burr on both edges of the knife, I personally give it a few strokes and then run a Sharpie down both bevels. Then I begin stroking both sides until all the Sharpie has been removed. That’s the technique that I’ve been taught by all the great forum members. Now how many strokes it takes to remove those markings cannot be determined, it might be 10 and it might be 310. Removing that Sharpie and changing the scratch pattern from vertical to diagonal/horizontal is my final goal as I progress through the stones. There are videos out there that teach otherwise.

    I thought the sharpie was just to find the proper angle, and not reapplied again that.

    #52067

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1881

    I thought the sharpie was just to find the proper angle, and not reapplied again that.

    The sharpie can be used anytime, or again and again, if you choose to use that method to determine you are working the entire knife edge and bevels, as indicated by the complete removal of the sharpie ink.  What method you use and how you use the method is determined by what you’re comfortable using.

    I find I can get and see same results simply observing the edge with a USB Microscope.

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #52068

    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 6
    • Replies: 92

    I use the sharpie for every stone change as an extra check that I set the right angle. You are correct in saying we use the sharpie line in establishing the correct sharpening angle but….Keep in mind that the sharpening stones can and will vary in thickness from grit to grit. The difference is minimal, but is there so, following the advice of the more experienced members,  I check the angles with every stone change.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #52069

    -Terry
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15

    Wealth of knowledge on this forum. Thanks everyone

    #52070

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1881

    I use the sharpie for every stone change as an extra check that I set the right angle. You are correct in saying we use the sharpie line in establishing the correct sharpening angle but….Keep in mind that the sharpening stones can and will vary in thickness from grit to grit. The difference is minimal, but is there so, following the advice of the more experienced members, I check the angles with every stone change.

    This introduces another point of discussion for me:

    The angles the cube reads allows you to set the guide rod angles the same, no matter how thick the stones are.  An angle = an angle.

    It is correct, a marker can show you when your angle is off by it’s removal from only a portion of the bevel.  If the angle is then double checked and verified as set correctly and precisely, then the marker is probably indicating the stone is not be held and used with the same finger position and/or finger pressure which it was used with the previous grit.  Changing stone pressure and finger position can steer the stone’s contact on the bevel.

    The newest version wider W.E. guide rods and the new tighter fitting W.E. plastic paddles, (included standard with all the latest version models), help eliminate most of this inconsistency, if your hand and finger pressure is always the same.  Using the marker can help you identify how you need to hold the paddles and position your fingers on the paddles to efficiently and completely work the entire bevel.  This is indicated by total clean removal of the marker when the angles are set the same.  Also, it’s indicated with a complete uniform scratch pattern across the entire bevel height from shoulder to apex when the marker is not used and the bevel is inspected with the USB scope.

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    5 users thanked author for this post.
    #52071

    Richard
    Participant
    • Topics: 7
    • Replies: 108

    Keep involved in this forum and you’ll learn the right way to use the Wicked Edge, not by watching videos from that YouTube channel that you mentioned before.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #52072

    -Terry
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15

    So in an effort to get a sharper edge today, I reprofiled my blade from 40° to 30°.  Unfortunately I still can’t get a paper slicing edge. I did use an angle cube, started with a 100 grit to reshape the bevels, got my wire edge on both sides each time, each grit, cleaning the blade between grits. 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000. After each grit beginning at the 200, I did 100 cleanup strokes. This time, the wire edge wasn’t as prevalent as with the 40° angle, but I did feel it. Not sure why I can’t get my desired edge. I do think my stones are broken in, because I’ve resharpened this blade several times for practice. The blade feels quite sharp, but doesn’t act like it. Is it possible that the steel is just too cheap? I understand there’s a learning process and  break in period for this, but it seems that I should have better results. As I said, slicing paper is what I’m basing my results on. It will cut if I draw the knife through, but not from just pushing it like I can with my brand new, Spydercos and Manix.

    #52073

    -Terry
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15

    Just to clarify, I have not tried using the sharpie between grits yet, because I had already resharpened it b4 I read that suggestion .

    #52074

    Richard
    Participant
    • Topics: 7
    • Replies: 108

    30 inclusive, right?

    #52075

    -Terry
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15

    30 inclusive, right?

    That is correct

    #52076

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1881

    FYI, by convention on this forum we generally speak of bevel angles per side, (dps for degree per side), as opposed to the sum of the sides or inclusively, (incl).  To avoid confusion it’ll help to label or define the angle’s as you mean them.

    I would keep working on your technique to insure you are apexing the knife edge on both sides, and along the entire knife’s length.  This is key with each and every grit.  It helps to check your angles with the cube to verify and adjust your guide rods angle settings with each and every grit in your sharpening progression.

    Counting strokes is a good method to keep your effort balanced from the knife’s side to side, but it’s arbitrary, just a number guess.  The count you choose may not reflect whats actually needed to achieve the sharpened edge you’re after.

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    4 users thanked author for this post.
    #52077

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 863

    If your stones are truly broken in and assuming that your technique is good, it is still possible to get poor results if the knife is so cheap that the steel has not been properly heat treated. I have a hunting knife that was a groomsman gift that I have never been able to get a decent edge on because of this problem.

    I suggest following the advise of the other forum members (checking angle after each grit change, working with a sharpie and magnification as a guide, using light pressure on the stones, holding the stones as consistently as possible). If this blade doesn’t get sharp after that then move on and work on another knife. You can always come back to it once you get more confident.

    Finally, a set of strops can dramatically improve the smoothness and push cutting ability of a sharp edge. If you don’t have any then get the 4 / 2 micron set as your next upgrade.

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #52078

    -Terry
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15

    If your stones are truly broken in and assuming that your technique is good, it is still possible to get poor results if the knife is so cheap that the steel has not been properly heat treated. I have a hunting knife that was a groomsman gift that I have never been able to get a decent edge on because of this problem. I suggest following the advise of the other forum members (checking angle after each grit change, working with a sharpie and magnification as a guide, using light pressure on the stones, holding the stones as consistently as possible). If this blade doesn’t get sharp after that then move on and work on another knife. You can always come back to it once you get more confident. Finally, a set of strops can dramatically improve the smoothness and push cutting ability of a sharp edge. If you don’t have any then get the 4 / 2 micron set as your next upgrade.

    Do I need something between the 1000 and strops, like a 1600 grit? No I can’t be absolutely sure my stones are truly broken in, but I’ve spent an awful lot of time using them, and Im getting way more metal filings, and less stone grit dust than before. Practice and patience have never been my strongpoints, but I guess itsi time to learn.

    #52079

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 863

    The strops work very differently from the stones. You will see an improvement in edge uniformity using a set of strops on even a 600 grit edge. There is no need to get an in between grit unless you want a higher level of edge refinement.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #52080

    -Terry
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15

    Any particular USB microscope recommended?

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 33 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.