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Mora Knife Flat Grind

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  • #23142
    Fred Hermann
    Participant
    • Topics: 30
    • Replies: 188

    So I bought one of these as a junk screwchisel shop knife…

    http://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EAL1090/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I decided to put a good edge on it, and am fooling with doing it as a real flat grind. It appears the angles are about 12 degrees, or 24 inclusive once you account for minor grind variables.

    My question, I’m having a tough time getting the grind consistent due to the minor variations in the diamond stones. So is it just a case of fooling with each side and each stone to ensure they are aligned right? I’ve got an angle guide which helps, but even the play in the rod/stones seems to make a difference in this case.

    Or am I over thinking this?

    #23145
    Mr.Wizard
    Participant
    • Topics: 5
    • Replies: 181

    Sometimes freehand is easier.

    #23189
    Fred Hermann
    Participant
    • Topics: 30
    • Replies: 188

    I’n this case, if I were free handing it, I’d end up with a convexed edge, assuming I could get it polished at all.
    This one is fighting me…which is weird for such a cheap knife…bah!

    #23193
    Leo Barr
    Participant
    • Topics: 26
    • Replies: 812

    It should be a scandi grind that is easy to freehand since there is so much to lay flat on the stone if you do not have fine enough stones to polish on use the WE stones you will be able to get a polished edge especially if you have the Choseras you just need to go slowly and keep looking at what is happening . It should not convex the edges provided you work carefully .

    #23203
    Mr.Wizard
    Participant
    • Topics: 5
    • Replies: 181

    I’n this case, if I were free handing it, I’d end up with a convexed edge, assuming I could get it polished at all.
    This one is fighting me…which is weird for such a cheap knife…bah!

    Since it’s “such a cheap knife” does it really matter if it’s not perfectly polished? And is a mild convex a bad thing? I think trying to match a wide bevel like that in a clamped system is just asking for trouble.

    #23209
    Steven N. Bolin
    Participant
    • Topics: 47
    • Replies: 456

    It should be a scandi grind that is easy to freehand since there is so much to lay flat on the stone if you do not have fine enough stones to polish on use the WE stones you will be able to get a polished edge especially if you have the Choseras you just need to go slowly and keep looking at what is happening . It should not convex the edges provided you work carefully .

    Scandi grinds are what they are because of free-hand sharpening!!!

    #23215
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 1941

    Fred:
    I’ve probably done more than anybody else in evaluating the effects of “slop” in the stones. I installed bronze bushings in my stones – and reduced the error to almost zero. For the last month or two, I’ve been running a new pair of unmodified 800/1000’s and I really can’t see much difference in the bevel angles.

    The effects of the looseness in the bores sliding along the rods can be minimized by keeping your grip point below the edge as much as possible. The really noticeable errors show up where you apply pressure above the edge, causing the stone to tip (rock) over. See the photos in my post on page three of “My First week with the WEPS” https://knife.wickededgeusa.com/forum/6-techniques-and-sharpening-strategies/13009-my-first-week-with-the-weps?start=20#17882

    I’ve found that there can be some variability in the “stone thickness” from the factory. I use the VSTAs (SWAT) with every grit change and have seen that I have to make a small microadjustment on a couple of unmodified stones when I am just turning the stone from one grit to the next. The difference is about 1/4 turn of the screw, which amounts to about 0.1 degrees. I can see the effects of 0.1 degree, but only at the higher grits; 800 and above.

    If you see really big differences in your bevel angles, I’d first look at how securely the blade is clamped in the vise. Many of us have learned the hard way that an improperly clamped blade can move from side to side. Until you recognize it, it’ll drive you nuts.

    My advice? 1. Learn to use the SWAT and make it a routine part of your process. 2. Always check for a secure mount by twisting back and forth on the handle to see if it will move. 3. Keep your grip low on the stones and avoid going high enough to roll the stones over the edge.

    Good luck.

    #23270
    Fred Hermann
    Participant
    • Topics: 30
    • Replies: 188

    Thanks for the tips, I’d missed your post about the variance, and the solutions to it.
    Great tips…now to see if they help or if I am hopeless… 🙂

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