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Larger Right Bevel

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  • #58992
    laverne
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    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by laverne.
    #58995
    Marc H
    Moderator
    • Topics: 75
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    For more discussions like this thread, I invite you to join my Facebook Group:

    https://www.facebook.com/share/3RH5rp3MVMLd1MZp/?mibextid=A7sQZp

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

    #58997
    tcmeyer
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    • Topics: 38
    • Replies: 2098

    Sorry for jumping in here without reading the previous posts (TLDR), but I have the following to share:

    Uneven bevels usually mean that the apex is off-center, assuming that the angles are the same, although I’ve seen it knives I ground rather badly, where the flats are not truly flat.

    To correct the differences, simply take more strokes on the narrow-bevel side until the bevel widths are comparable.

    If the apex is too far off-center, the knife will tend to drift to the narrow bevel side when cutting certain materials.  I’ve actually ground kitchen knives like that on purpose as they will tend to cut a straight line on the narrow-bevel side.  Think chisel grind, which the off-center grind is approaching.  Most desirable when cutting thin slices of hard salami or radishes and the like.

    #58998
    Marc H
    Moderator
    • Topics: 75
    • Replies: 2744

    What Tom said.

    It depends on the knife along with the situation.

    For instance, a knife that is ground to be an “uneven grind” does have a centered knife edge. All of my right-handed, RH 70/30 Japanese knives have slightly different shaped primary grinds on each side of the knife, along with uneven bevel heights. But the bevel angles are similar. (Since many are hand ground knives I’ll allow a little latitude for bevel angles.)

    With these knives held in a RH, edge cutting-board down, the right side, the outside bevel is taller. The inside bevel, on the left side, edge down, nearer to what you’re cutting, is much less pronounced. The outside is the 70 of 70/30, while the shorter inside bevel is the 30 of the 70/30 designation.  The 70/30 describes the proportion of effort to each side.

    These RH uneven grind bevel knives tend to be flatter on the inside grinds and more typical on the outside. The combination of how the knife sides are ground along with this more or less sharpening technique, they combine to contribute to how well and how straight these knives cut.

    As Tom says, a knives intended to be a typical, common, 50/50 symmetrically ground knife, when improperly ground or improperly sharpened, may have a miss-centered knife edge and uneven bevels. The bevel angles may or may not be the same. Who knows. Time, effort and attention to detail can correct that on a properly used WEPS.

    With the increase in small artistic knife makers mixed with modern technology, creativity, artistry and imagination mixed with mini CNC technology, only the imagination limits knife edge grinds and symmetry. There’s no rules.

     

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

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