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Is there a long knife clamp/holder?

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  • #42577
    graphite
    Participant
    • Topics: 10
    • Replies: 101

    On the topic of diamond stone break-in period, I had an idea while brushing my teeth. You know how some tooth brushes have a couple rows of colored bristles, and as the color gets worn away with use, it serves as an indicator that it’s time for a new tooth brush? I’m going to try something similar with my diamond stones.

    I’ve drawn a red sharpie line down the middle (lengthwise) of all my stones (and a green sharpie line down each one’s match pair of grit, just in case the color of the sharpie happens to matter). The thought is that the sharpie coloring will gradually wear away (even the ink that gets down below the diamond surface will eventually be abraded away I think, due to metal/diamond particles being drawn across it).

    I have no idea whether it will coincide with the stone being adequately broken in, but if nothing else it will help guide a more uniform use of the entire length of the stone, by trying to keep the amount of sharpie ink at a constant level of wear across the full stone length.

    And if the idea turns out to be a total bust and doesn’t work at all, nothing is lost. Just spritz the sharpie lines with denatured alcohol and the sharpie lines disappear (I tested this before I marked all my stone).

    But if it does work to some degree, it would be a really easy thing that anyone can do, and for first-time diamond stone users like me, it would take some of the arbitrariness out of the break-in process. We’ll see if it works…

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #42583
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2020

    Marc, How many knives have you done so far? I’m contemplating how to handle my new stones. I do not have a microscope yet. I also do not have any cheap knives to break them in on. I can’t actually sharpen any knives at the moment as my system isn’t fully complete, my upgrade went astray. Thinking about just shelving the whole deal till I can figure out the best plan of approach. New thread may be ideal lol!

    They’re pretty well broken in now. I know I sharpened more then ten knives.  I didn’t sharpen any beaters.  All were knives to be used by their owners.  I did start with first using the new stone then followed with the used stone of the same grit.  So I did the grit progression twice for several knives.  Then I just used the new diamond stones exclusively. The results they give are a little less smooth and shinny then if the stones were well broken in but the new stones don’t hurt the knives and they do sharpen the knives well.  It’s mostly a cosmetic thing.

    The first time I broke in diamond stones I was a new Wicked Edge users with a lot to learn.  I had no prior experience.  I was trying to figure the whole system out, then, learning and developing a technique, while getting through the learning curve.  Breaking in these new diamond stones was not an issue now because I knew what to expect and what to look for, and how to use the WEPS properly.  The reason we recommend using beater knives when breaking in the new diamonds is because the WEPS user with new stones, is usually a new users, a beginner, with no prior experience.  We don’t want you to use the WEPS improperly on a good knife with coarse new diamond stones and do damage to your good knife.  I know how to use the WEPS and use new diamond stones so I won’t damage the knives. These were knives I was sharpening for friends for their everyday using.  They weren’t looking for mirrored bevels.  Just a sharp knife which is exactly what I returned to them.

     

     

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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    #42584
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    Yep, 10 knives should be enough to have your stones broken in. That does not mean stones that are not broken in won’t give sharp edges, as Marc writes. Even with stones not broken in your knives will probably be sharper than ever.

    Another reason to use some beater knives at first is that it gives you some time to perfect your technique.

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #42602
    Justin Fournier
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 54

    Thanks Guy. Marc I did the same thing as you with my first set of stone now a few years old. But I’m way more particular about everything to do with the system now than I was before.

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    #42787
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2020

    Marc I did the same thing as you with my first set of stone now a few years old. But I’m way more particular about everything to do with the system now than I was before.

    Justin, I don’t follow, what exactly did you do with your first set of stones now a few years old that is the same thing I did?

    Now, what exactly are you going to do, differently, to break in your stones, this time, since you are way more particular about everything to do with the system now, than you were before?  I’m always open to advice or pointers on how to step up my game.  Thanks!

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #42812
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 35
    • Replies: 1893

    If one is bound and determined that they want to reduce or eliminate the break-in efforts, I’d recommend that you try working the stones over a piece of glass (or ceramic), but use a section which is straight and fits in the vise jaws.  Glass is way harder than steel, but is much softer than the diamond particles.  The glass should knock off the diamonds which are not directly attached to the steel platens in a very small number of strokes – depending on how much pressure you apply, maybe as few as four or five strokes.

    I didn’t see it mentioned in this thread, but quite a few of us go to the local thrift stores to buy really, really inexpensive knives – usually less than $1 each.  We then use these as “mules” to practice on and get the break-in function for next to nothing.  Unless the knife is a real junker, when you’re done, you can always find somebody you can gift it to.  Everybody loves a sharp knife.  I have a half-dozen different razor-sharp Chicago Cutlery knives waiting for happy homes.

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    #42840
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    Unless the knife is a real junker, when you’re done, you can always find somebody you can gift it to. Everybody loves a sharp knife. I have a half-dozen different razor-sharp Chicago Cutlery knives waiting for happy homes.

    🙂

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

    1 user thanked author for this post.
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