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  • #54901
    Mark
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 3

    I will start off by saying I am brand new to sharpening, so I know little to nothing. Have a WE130. I have sharpened to date  about ten knives with reasonable descent success. My neighbors brought over some Chinese made Calphalon Knives. I found the angle fairly quickly. (seemed low at 14 degrees)

    As I continued the process I absolutely could not get a bevel. Started with 600 grit stones and went down to 100 grit. Could not detect any type of bevel. Can’t figure out what I am doing wrong. All of the marker comes off indicating to me I am close to the proper angle but no matter how many strokes, no bevel. Any words of wisdom other than taking up basket weaving. My thanks.

     
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    #54903
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 61
    • Replies: 2148

    Welcome to the Wicked Edfe forum, Mark.  After 10 knives I’d expect you have a basic understanding of what it takes to sharpen a knife.  Also your sharpening stones should be reasonably well broken in.

    You wrote you could not get a bevel….I’m guessing you’re meaning you can’t form and feel a burr.  You probably just haven’t removed enough steel yet.

    I’d suggest you reset your sharpening angles to 20 degrees per side.  This wider angle will place your sharpening efforts more towards the knife’s edge.  This should allow you to apex the knife edge and form and feel the burr more easily.  Once you can feel the burr has formed, you can lower the sharpening set angles by 1 or 2 degrees each adjustment.  After forming and finding the burr again, with this lowered angle, re-adjust it, lower again.  This will allow you to walk the angle down to the 14 degree setting you originally guessed or determined it to be.

    A magnified visual aid like a lighted jeweler’s loupe or a USB microscope is an invaluable tool many of us use to allow us to see exactly where our sharpening stones are removing steel from the knife as they form the bevels.  With a visual aid I believe you’d see all your sharpening efforts are lower down from the knife edge then you suspect they are.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

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    #54904
    Mark
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 3

    Thank you very much. Great advise. Will give it a try. The few knives I have sharpened so far, the burr was very evident. I have tried two of these Calphalon kitchen knives with the same poor result. Will let you know how it goes. Again my sincere thanks. I was pretty much lost.
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    #54905
    Mark
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 3

    Marc,

    Just tried your recommendation. Worked beautifully. Felt the burr very quickly. Can’t thank you enough!

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #54906
    cmyhero
    Participant
    • Topics: 10
    • Replies: 26

    Wow MarcH you have answered a question I had as well.. I was practicing on a cheap knife and it was bending with the slightest pressure so I tried the KO Worksharp and was having difficulties so I took it to my old ChefsChoice XV and in about 5 minutes I had a hair shaving edge which I stropped with the pre  “seasoned” knivesplus strop to further refine.  What you said in a previous post about WE not the only tool to use really helped me again. Many thanks..

    #54909
    airscapes
    Participant
    • Topics: 13
    • Replies: 286

    Another think to always check when you get down below 15 degrees is that your stone is not hitting the vise.. it can take a long time to remove enough vise to get a burr.. been there don that!

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #54911
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 61
    • Replies: 2148

    I agree with airscapes’ suggestion that you should always inspect for stone-vise contact first when you experience that issue where you can’t form a burr.  That should become a regular part of your sharpening regimen with any knife you’re working on.

    14 degree angle settings are really at the lower range limit that you can sharpen a knife with the W.E. unless it is a large or a tall knife like a Chef’s knife or a Santoku Knife.  These two knives are tall enough that they just may clamp high enough above the jaw line to allow for the 14 degree setting without stone-jaw contact like airscapes warned about.

    Usually to sharpen a knife with the W.E. at anything below 15 degrees per sides the knife must be clamped high up in the jaws, often just held by the jaw tips, or an accessory like the low angle adapter, L.A.A., must be employed.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-Its)

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