Advanced Search

Hair line scratches

Recent Forums Main Forum Techniques and Sharpening Strategies Hair line scratches

This topic contains 8 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  tcmeyer 07/11/2018 at 2:24 am.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #46865

    TI2525
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 3

    New member here! Has anybody delt with little hair line scratches after sharpening? I even taped it off all the way to the edge to make sure this wouldn’t happen so any explanation on how to avoid these would be awesome! Thanks everyone!🍻

    Attachments:
    #46868

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 31
    • Replies: 1562

    I gonna guess that the photo shows the tip of a drop=point blade, with small scratches on the sides right behind and on the bevels of the tip.  If so, I think the scratches are being caused by the trail end of the stones as they are dragged over the tip.  Try to follow-thru.  The stones should not rotate as they leave the tip, nor should the tip be touched by the bottom ends of the stones.

    For that matter, try to never touch the edge with the very top or bottom of the stones.  Too many bad things can happen.

    FWIW, all beginning users and some veterans face the matter of refining their technique.  For example, I stone one side at a time and use 14″ rods, so I’ve had to get creative about the return strokes, as this is a big time loser. Read that as meaning a significant loss of speed – no hyphen between big and time.  I learned to swing my stones well away from the blade and from there I learned to return the stones toward very rapidly – almost a snapping motion.  I can hit the start position almost perfectly every time and cut my time by about 25-30%.

    #46869

    TI2525
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 3

    Thanks for the reply! But what I still don’t understand is how those marts would get there if I had it taped all the way to the edge. You’re probably right about it being the tail end of the stone dragging through. But even then if I make slow strokes to watch the stone as it glides across the edge I don’t see a way that it could drag across it like that. I’m stumped.

    #46876

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 48
    • Replies: 1136

    Welcome to the Wicked Edge Forum and Community, TI2525.  I recently had this discussion with a WE Forum compatriot via email concerning this same issue he was relating from, I believe, the WE Face Book page.

    My take on this issue is essentially the same as tcmeyer’s.  This issue I usually see experienced with new users of the Wicked Edge.  When we first get started we have yet to develop good technique.  Along with this our stones are still fairly new and still breaking in.  These new stones I believe drop a lot of left over excess diamond dust that becomes loosened and sloughs off as the new stones are used.  Along with this the newer less experienced sharpeners, I believe have a tendency to pick up this dust on their fingers tips, (gloved or ungloved) and drag this dust across the knife sides as they are still learning to sharpen their knives.  As the stones break in more and get better, I believe they get cleaner to use and don’t drop this loose diamond dust left over from the manufacturing process.  Along with this their technique expectedly improves, too.  So it becomes less and less an issue as time goes on.  We learn to work cleaner and exercise greater care and have better technique so we drag our finger less across the knife sides.

    I believe taping the knife sides will provide some protection.  I have seen steel dust from sharpening collect right on the top edge of the tape and leave a fine line of scratches just at the tape level right below the bevel shoulder. When removing the tape and cleaning the sharpened knife there is still a chance to scratch the knife with dust picked up on the fingers and from the tape.   I believe with good technique and careful practice when the stones are broken in this is less of an issue and easier to avoid.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    #46881

    TI2525
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 3

    Hey MarcH! Thanks your for the reply! So I understand the stones have break in periods and all of that, is there a certain travel speed that I need to go across the edge with to possibly reduce a finger drag? Although I have been real particular with keeping my fingers inside the grooves to keep from cutting myself so I don’t think I could have drug my finger across it. Another question, so after using each set of stones do you think compressed air might help keep the trash and loose diamonds out from behind the tape? Would a better quality masking tape help? Thanks for the input!

    #46882

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 48
    • Replies: 1136

    Sorry… give time, time.  Everything you do you’ll get improved results.  The stones will get cleaner.  Soon they’ll have nothing loose to drop and will only improve with time.  I don’t believe it has any relation to travel speed.  Your technique will improve.  You’ll be more careful cleaning the sharpened blade.   Each knife you sharpen you’ll pay more attension to more factors at the same time.   Also, I use plastic safety shields.  These are a barrier to prevent my fingers from dragging across the knives and keep me from being in a position to cut myself.  Ask me how I know!!

    Compressed air wouldn’t hurt, it may help.  I don’t think the quality of tape is a factor.  Like I said give time, time.  Before you realize it won’t be a problem any longer.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #46883

    TI2525
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 3

    Good deal,  I’ll post and update here maybe by the end of this week! I appreciate the help everyone👍

    #46885

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 48
    • Replies: 1136

    Realize when sharpening knives we always throw off steel dust.  I know this is not as abrasive as the diamond dust and doesn’t causes as much of the stray scratches.  But we still need to operate with caution.  Some of us use “Swifters” to wipe the loose dust.  Some use the “Swifter” dust cloths or Alcohol lens cleaning cloths.  Still others like brushes like paint brushes.  Find what you like to use to control and contain the steel dust.  Don’t misunderstand me it’s not floating around in the air scratching everything but it can cause scratches when put in the proper position.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    #46886

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 31
    • Replies: 1562

    I for one, wish to go on record as not believing that scratches on the sides of blades are caused by loose steel or diamond particles.  To produce a scratch, a particle harder than the blade must be pressed against and driven along the surface.  Gently wiping the blade down with a cloth or some other material simply will not apply enough force to create a scratch.  It might work when cleaning your plastic or glass spectacles, but not on steel. You have to have a substantial amount of force applied to make it happen.  The only force in the neighborhood of your mounted blade is applied by the face of the stones against the bevels.  Unless the operator carelessly allows it to touch the blade elsewhere.

    There have been reports of clouds of airborne dust particles seen around knives while they are being sharpened on a WEPS.  Perhaps these dust particles include bits of diamonds, which have about one-half of the density of steel.  Past discussions on this matter were centered around the dangers of respiratory pollutants.

    By the way, I am a strong proponent of using the Swiffer duster.  To see its effectiveness, use a USB microscope to look at a blade which is being sharpened before and after wiping with a Swiffer.  Further evidence appears when you see how quickly the duster turns gray with steel dust.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.