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German Steels

This topic contains 21 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Geocyclist 05/25/2014 at 6:40 pm.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
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  • #8141

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
    • Replies: 2898

    I’ve been sharpening a lot of German kitchen blades and generally find that the mainstream products don’t support an angle below 20 degrees well. What have others been finding?

    -Clay

    #8148

    Mikedoh
    Moderator
    • Topics: 38
    • Replies: 560

    I have a Henckles 2guy pro S paring knife that is at 17.8, but haven’t been using it a lot lately. I’ll try to start using it more and see what happens.

    #8149

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
    • Replies: 2898

    I’ve taken some of mine down to 17, only to feel that I needed to add back a 20 degree micro-bevel.

    -Clay

    #8154

    Ted S
    Participant
    • Topics: 7
    • Replies: 31

    I have some Messermeister knives (Meridian Elite – X50CrMoV15) that I have yet to sharpen with the WE. I just called Messermeister customer service (1-800-426-5134)who said they leave the factory with a 15 degree edge.

    Also found out that they offer free lifetime sharpening for their knives.

    #8155

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
    • Replies: 2898

    X50CrMoV15 is probably the most common steel coming out of Germany right now. Ted, how have your knives held up so far since you got them?

    -Clay

    #8158

    Ted S
    Participant
    • Topics: 7
    • Replies: 31

    X50CrMoV15 is probably the most common steel coming out of Germany right now. Ted, how have your knives held up so far since you got them?

    No experience with them yet because I bought them from a Craigslister after I recently bought the WE. 🙂

    #8159

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
    • Replies: 2898

    X50CrMoV15 is probably the most common steel coming out of Germany right now. Ted, how have your knives held up so far since you got them?

    No experience with them yet because I bought them from a Craigslister after I recently bought the WE. :)[/quote]

    I’ll be interested to hear your experiences once you put them to use and also after you sharpen them. Will you sharpen them first or use them as is and wait to sharpen until they need it?

    -Clay

    #8174

    Geocyclist
    Participant
    • Topics: 25
    • Replies: 524

    I have had a set of Wusthof’s for 1 year. The edge was so fine in the beginning that I had to steel very carefully as I could feel it move from side to side. A year later that affect is gone so I have lost some edge for sure. I have only steeled them and never sharpened them. We are not serious cooks so they don’t get used every day by any means. But they are still sharp a year later, can shave paper with no problem.

    I have been waiting to get the WE before sharpening them. Once I get all of junk knives sharpened I will work on these. I am also curious to see what the factory angle is.

    Reading the specs on X50CrMoV15 I was not super impressed compared to CPM M4. But I am impressed a year later, they have held up very well. I have only cut food with them and never abused them in any way. So if you’re cutting through bones your mileage may vary.

    #8178

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
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    Part of my problem with my German knives is that my sharpness standard has become ridiculously high 🙂 A few years ago, I was really impressed with how well they were holding up as well, could go months without a touch up. Now the bar is higher and when a blade loses that incredibly keen feel, I notice right away. Most people would think they’re still smoking sharp, but it’s just not the same anymore.

    -Clay

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    #8180

    Geocyclist
    Participant
    • Topics: 25
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    I guess I don’t cook enough? :cheer:

    #8182

    Ted S
    Participant
    • Topics: 7
    • Replies: 31

    X50CrMoV15 is probably the most common steel coming out of Germany right now. Ted, how have your knives held up so far since you got them?

    No experience with them yet because I bought them from a Craigslister after I recently bought the WE. :)[/quote]

    I’ll be interested to hear your experiences once you put them to use and also after you sharpen them. Will you sharpen them first or use them as is and wait to sharpen until they need it?[/quote]I was planning on sharpening them first but might send them back to Messermeister for their free lifetime sharpening just to have a baseline for comparision.

    #8185

    Tom Whittington
    Participant
    • Topics: 4
    • Replies: 159

    Part of my problem with my German knives is that my sharpness standard has become ridiculously high 🙂 A few years ago, I was really impressed with how well they were holding up as well, could go months without a touch up. Now the bar is higher and when a blade loses that incredibly keen feel, I notice right away. Most people would think they’re still smoking sharp, but it’s just not the same anymore.

    I know what you mean, Clay 🙂 I recently did some less than stellar quality “as seen on TV” sort of knives for a family friend and they didn’t really seem to get as sharp as I’d have liked. Fast forward to the first time she used one to chop some apples up and it scared her half to death despite my warnings! Straight through the apple, the paper plate and into the cutting board :whistle:

    Not really on topic for German steels (though I still have that crazy Puma Waidblatt that’s hardly fit for the “cooking” category :silly: ) but most regular production knives under about $100 I’ve encountered left me wanting on the sharpness side of things.

    #9421

    R. Jeffrey Coates
    Participant
    • Topics: 9
    • Replies: 55

    Agreed. What used to pass as a great edge is now subject to scrutiny because one has used a sharper knife or read something about how it could be sharper.

    Recently I have found that I enjoy working with carbon steel blades. They take a great edge, and although they do not hold it for a long time, when they are sharp they are really sharp. Very old Henckels / Sabatier / Wusthof

    I also use an old (from the 1970s) set of Chicago Cutlery knives. They too take a great edge. – and I like the wooden scales. I know they are not the highest regarded blades but they were my first knives – a gift from my parents long ago. I think of them when I use those knives. They make me feel good. 40 years later … I guess that says a lot.

    The Japanese blades are an entirely different discussion ! By comparison to my “German” blades, the Japanese blades hardly ever need a tune up.

    #9438

    David
    Participant
    • Topics: 14
    • Replies: 47

    I have found for the German knives I’ve sharpened they do best at 20-22 degrees and a 1k edge stropped with 3.5um paste.

    #9446

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 121
    • Replies: 2898

    Agreed. What used to pass as a great edge is now subject to scrutiny because one has used a sharper knife or read something about how it could be sharper.

    Recently I have found that I enjoy working with carbon steel blades. They take a great edge, and although they do not hold it for a long time, when they are sharp they are really sharp. Very old Henckels / Sabatier / Wusthof

    I also use an old (from the 1970s) set of Chicago Cutlery knives. They too take a great edge. – and I like the wooden scales. I know they are not the highest regarded blades but they were my first knives – a gift from my parents long ago. I think of them when I use those knives. They make me feel good. 40 years later … I guess that says a lot.

    The Japanese blades are an entirely different discussion ! By comparison to my “German” blades, the Japanese blades hardly ever need a tune up.

    Nice post. I’ve also got a couple of blades that mean something to me even though they’re not made from especially great materials. They remind me of something/someone and are a joy to sharpen and use for that reason. Every time I sharpen them or use them, it’s like connecting with that person again. I wonder what stories others here on the forum might have about a knife that really means something to them because of how they came to own it or use it; might be a good topic on its own.

    -Clay

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