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Diamond Stones shaped for convex edges

Recent Forums Main Forum Product Announcements Diamond Stones shaped for convex edges

This topic contains 13 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Mikedoh 05/26/2018 at 6:38 pm.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #46274

    Alan Yip Choy
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 6

    Is it possible to make diamond stones that are shallow curved along their length in order to handle convex edges?

    #46275

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 50
    • Replies: 1206
    #46278

    David
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 6

    On my browser the URL didn’t parse correctly, let’s see if this is more click-friendly for Alan:

    https://wickededgeusa.com/collections/sharpening-stones/products/medium-400-grit-fine-600-grit-stones-for-curved-blades-1

    But note his question was about diamond stones; and with all the forum posts I’ve read about folks who have become disenchanted with their ceramics I wonder the same thing.

    #46279

    Alan Yip Choy
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 6

    Hi Folks,

    I was not clear enough. I meant that the stones would actually be curved in a very slight C curve not cross sectionally (SP?) as the ceramics that you sent me the link for (I have a pair of these already). Sort of like the brackets that I used in this post.

    Thanks again for your replies.

     

    #46280

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 16
    • Replies: 576

    Ah, I see what you’re getting at. You’re thinking of having the plates with a slight radius across the length of the cutting surface to intentionally put a convex edge on the blade. I imagine that it would be possible, but given that you can get a convex edge by making several facets and then blending them with strops without any extra tools, I don’t know if there would be much of a market for that idea.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #46281

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 50
    • Replies: 1206

    But note his question was about diamond stones; and with all the forum posts I’ve read about folks who have become disenchanted with their ceramics I wonder the same thing.

    These curved ceramics are of a much coarser grit as compared to the flat polishing micro-fine and ultra-fine ceramics that have a very long break-in period before you realize their benefits.  The coarser curved ceramics did seem to work well for me right out-of-the-box. They exhibited a scratched pattern very similar to my comparable grit whetstones.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    #46282

    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 117
    • Replies: 2836

    but given that you can get a convex edge by making several facets and then blending them with strops without any extra tools, I don’t know if there would be much of a market for that idea.

    Plus, we’re working on something else right now to address convex edges in a really neat way. It’s still very much under development, but the proof of concept works great.

    -Clay

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #46283

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 16
    • Replies: 576

    but given that you can get a convex edge by making several facets and then blending them with strops without any extra tools, I don’t know if there would be much of a market for that idea.

    Plus, we’re working on something else right now to address convex edges in a really neat way. It’s still very much under development, but the proof of concept works great.

    Keep us posted when you’re ready to break the news!

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #46289

    David
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 6

    …you can get a convex edge by making several facets and then blending them with strops..

    I’d love some detailed instructions/guidance on this. Does this entail rotating the stones from the plane of the blade?

    #46290

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 16
    • Replies: 576

    …you can get a convex edge by making several facets and then blending them with strops..

    I’d love some detailed instructions/guidance on this. Does this entail rotating the stones from the plane of the blade?

    The process has been described several times on the forum and the knowledge base has good article on the topic as well. Here’s a recent thread on convex edges.

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #46421

    Peter Lai
    Participant
    • Topics: 1
    • Replies: 5

    I thought KME has a curved rod specifically for convex edge sharpening.  Clay, is this the route your design team thinking or something even more elegant?

    #46430

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 31
    • Replies: 1586

    The curved stone face (or curved rods) seems like a really interesting approach, but I wonder how you’d actually make it work.  For instance, if the stones had a concave face and if you used diagonal down-strokes from tip to heel, the tip end of the edge would have a lower angle than the heel end.  Switching to heel-to-tip diagonal strokes would theoretically result in two bevel facets at each end of the blade, with a section in the middle which would have a single more-or-less average facet angle.  To achieve a uniform convex profile, you’d have to hone every point along the edge with every point along the face of the stone.  Not unworkable, but I think it would demand quite a bit of focus and repeated inspections on the part of the user.

    What do you think guys?  Am I over-analyzing this?

    The videos I posted of the two convex edges were a bit disappointing in terms of quality, but I had hoped for some commentary so that we could discuss other options and methods.  Also, I didn’t make a big deal out of it, but by making a number of smaller angle incremental changes, the facets seem to blend together beautifully, making the use of strops unnecessary.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #46438

    NickedEdge
    Participant
    • Topics: 9
    • Replies: 53

    The blended bevel reminds me of digital audio, when you have enough frequency sampling points it begins to result in a near analog recording…

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #46439

    Mikedoh
    Moderator
    • Topics: 38
    • Replies: 551

    The blended bevel reminds me of digital audio, when you have enough frequency sampling points it begins to result in a near analog recording…

    Ive always looked at digital/analog as particle/wave duality.

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