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Damn, I really just screwed this edge up?

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  • #46352
    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 929

    The screw is a torx head. These are common on knives.

    #46353
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 36
    • Replies: 1925

    I have all the Torx drivers and the photo doesn’t look like screws I’ve seen before.  The “spokes” are too small for a torx.

    #46354
    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 929

    Okay, I just looked at it again and you’re right. That doesn’t look like a torx. Other Benchmades have a torx screw for their thumb studs, even other emissary models.

    Image result for benchmade emissary

    #46368
    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 46
    • Replies: 336

    I was going by the BM website: It said . . The key is to maintain the edge angles on the blade. Our knife blades leave the factory with a 30-35 degree inclusive angle. We recommend you use our LifeSharp™ service. This is a great way to get your knife sharpened, but to also have our qualified technicians service it for optimal performance.</span>

    Either way, today I sent it back for a new blade.  I had a couple of small verticle scratches I also put on the blade so for them to re-sharpen my old blade those scratches would still be there.  I didn’t buy this one used it was brand new for like $197!
    That little recurve as I said above was still dented in a litlle from the side.  I couldn’t live with that!
    #46369
    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 46
    • Replies: 336

    You know now I think I know why this blade was so easy for me to screw up.  I bet its because its the hardness of the steel since its S30V.

    My office mate tried WE sharpening on his Para 2 with CPM S110V steel and he screwed his up too.  He had to send it into Spyderco for a new blade!

    #46371
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2079

    It is harder to sharpen hard steel blades then softer steels and it does require a higher or better level of experience, technique and attention to detail.  Especially knives with intricate shapes,  grinds and thumb pegs.  So based on that, with experience deficiencies in these areas, I guess you can conclude it’s easier to screw them up.

    Sharpening with the WE there is a learning curve.  All knives and steel do not sharpen the same.  Some require more experience, expertise and proper learned technique.   I’ve been at it 4 or 5 years now and I’m still learning!   I suggest you don’t sharpen above your pay grade!

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    #46373
    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 46
    • Replies: 336

    Haha, I was just about to say now i’m antsy in aproaching a mirror edge on the others i’m keeping in my collection.  They are all S30V or S90V.

    Chris Reeve uses their own proprietary steel CPM S35VN.  I don’t see where it would land on this hardness scale, but it only took me 30 min to get a burr starting with the 200 grit stone.  It came out great last month when I did it (my best yet).

     

     

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    #46375
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2079

    I’m not familiar with that hardness chart.  I’m use to the HRc hardness scales.

    I try to use the finest grit I can get by with.  IMO 30 minutes seems like a long time to draw the initial burr.  I probably would have stepped back to 100 grit.  Remember the longer you use the coarser grits the more they tend to wear.  I do want them to get broken in, without getting broken down.  I try to use the appropriate grit for the job.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #46385
    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 46
    • Replies: 336

    Okay, I just looked at it again and you’re right. That doesn’t look like a torx. Other Benchmades have a torx screw for their thumb studs, even other emissary models. Image result for benchmade emissary

     

    Expidia said: The Emissary looked like a strange torx style to me also.  But my standard torx set (made buy Benchmade though) fit the thumbstud.

    I have that knife in the pic looks like the Assisted Arcane.  I’m selling it though.  I find the smooth scales aluminum scales not only very slippery but its black and very fine pencil point white sized chips appear. I touch them up with a tip of a black flair point but under the scales must be a white underlayment.  It has a $260 MSRP and sells online for $221.  It was the first Benchmark I bought retail.  feel their quality control has been going downhill and why I switched to Chris Reeve brand.  I’m selling a Griptilian, Arcane and an Osborne 940-1 CF.  The grip and the Osborne both have that torx stud.

     

     

     

    #46386
    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 46
    • Replies: 336

    That why I started with the 200.  I remember a comment from Organic I think . . . that said if you start with too low a grit you can cause micro chipping on premium steels as the  metal is so hard.

    I gotta say, since I didn’t care about the blade on the Emissary after I messed it up, I tried to save it by taking metal off near the heel to reduce the recurve and started with the 50 grit.  Even stroking it very lightly it took about two minutes to raise a large burr.  Probably also because I had already re-profiled it the first time around and it was hitting the apex instantly

    On the blades Im keeping for my collection, I’d rather spend more time initially and prevent micro chipping.  My problem now is its as you say it takes experience.  Well, I learned how to do the kitchen knives easy enough because they were all the same style.  But who can practice on premium steel folder.

    Plus as others have said, folders are tougher to do because the blades are shorter, different styles to the blades and handles do to their varying shapes are tougher to clamp correctly.  The Tormec adapte sure helps me.

    But how do I get practice?   Maybe another FL vacation for me, so I can swing by a certain afficianado of the WE system house?

    How about I mail you one of them and you can do a youtube vid showing what it takes to do a folder with a premium blade haha.

    I’ll have to search youtube again.  All the vids on WE I’ve seen are mostly basic kitchen knives. Maybe there are ones that were done on expensive folders.

    Actually, I’ve watched Clay doing a Youtube vid a month ago (from 4 years ago) on a Sebenza and he also did one on another Benchmade I have I think.  He didn’t do it much different than he does the kitchen knives.  I’ll have to re-watch them again.

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by Expidia.
    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by Expidia.
    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by Expidia.
    #46390
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2079

    There is a balance I try to find between using the appropriate grit for the job and using too coarse a grit that it’ll cause micro-chipping when sharpening the “super stainless steels”.  My “super stainless steel” composed knives are all “the easy enough” to sharpen, kitchen knives. (LOL)  I have chipped a few edges and had to learn how to treat some of these through second and third sharpening tries on the WEPS.  I also have amassed a wide variety and collection of different sharpening media so I may have and employ the “right stone” for the steel.  I have heeded the warnings of others that a coarse grit stone can cause microchips.  I have been the one to give warnings, on this Forum, too.  It still takes, for me, that personal experience to learn just how coarse is too coarse, to use.  I’m willing to and able to attempt and learn through my errors.

    The difference is for me these are just another knife I bought to use, sharpen and enjoy.  “Just stuff”.  Some are inexpensive “stuff” and others are really very nice “stuff”.  Just “stuff” nonetheless.  I enjoy feeling the difference in how nice stuff performs VS inexpensive stuff and learning the difference in how to sharpen nice stuff and the inexpensive stuff.  If I chip or scratch one while using it or sharpening it, well that’s OK.  I don’t collect them with the intention to sell them off for a profit.  I collect them to use them and enjoy them and have fun learning how to sharpen the various qualities, kinds, types and hardness steels.  Not to write on a Forum how much they cost me!

    I have sharpened maybe about 20 different folders.  Some I have sharpened for friends.  I am a relative novice when it comes to pocket knives.  The ones I didn’t know how to deal with I researched on the web, discussed with sharpening buddies from the Forums and watched YouTube Videos to learn how others have done them.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    #46394
    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
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    Clay always makes it look super easy. I’m not saying that it’s difficult, I just know that there are a lot of little things that he’s doing that are not communicated in his relatively short videos. He almost always has the blade placement worked out before the camera gets rolling (an essential step for good looking bevels) and I think he uses a very light touch.

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    #46395
    Organic
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    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 929

    One way to avoid unnecessary wear on the medium grit stones while avoiding the deep scratches at the apex is to start off with the coarse stones but intentionally switch grits before reaching the apex. This method requires close monitoring of your sharpening progress with a USB scope. This can allow you to do the majority of the re-profile work with the 50 or 80 grit and then put a nice, chip-free apex on with the 200 or 400 grit stones. Another method is to intentionally file down the apex (also referred to as de-stressing the edge) when you get to the 400 or 600 and then put a new apex on with one of those stones. This method will eat a little more steel than the USB guided method.

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    #46396
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
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    Edge leading strokes VS edge following or trailing will also give different results with concern to edge chipping.  I really think edge trailing strokes with coarse grit results in a greater chance for edge micro- chips.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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    #46401
    Expidia
    Participant
    • Topics: 46
    • Replies: 336

    Just so I get this straight in my head.  Edge leading vs edge trailing?  For the layman . . . moving a stone from heel to tip is which?

    Moving a stone from tip to heel is which?

    What I do know and has recently finally healed is when I slipped off the tip a few weeks ago and the natural next motion is to reverse the stroke which planted the tip firmly into the skin just to left side of my nail of my thumb . . . that was called edge “bleeding” hahaha

    And of course I was not wearing my gloves.  I looked to the side just for a second while going through the motions and “thats all she wrote”.  I ordered the 10 inch rods after that one which allows me to now grip the stones lower, so as to always keep my fingers below the tip!

     

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