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Chips in Edge After Sharpening?

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  • #42543
    Readheads
    Participant
    • Topics: 25
    • Replies: 286

    I was wondering what you guys think about rubbing 2 handles of the same grit against each other to help break in and general consistency.

    #42545
    Mikedoh
    Moderator
    • Topics: 38
    • Replies: 563

    Have seen Clay post it is not a good idea for the diamond stones.

    #42547
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 1932

    Rubbing two diamond stones against each other has been a no-no from the get-go.  What makes the diamonds effective is the sharpness of the diamonds at their highest point – the point that contacts the blade.  Rubbing them together would tend to dull them very quickly, probably in seconds.

    #42548
    Readheads
    Participant
    • Topics: 25
    • Replies: 286

    It would seem that very light rubbing, maybe under water, might help the break in sceario. The effect should be verifiable under a scope. I also wonder why WEPS doesn’t take care of this during manufacturing. It would eliminate a negative on the system. For the $ we pay I would expect this could be taken care of prior to packing.

    #42549
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2104

    I wouldn’t want anyone breaking my stones in for me.  I believe the stones take on the character of the users method as he uses them.  My broken in stones may behave and feel differently then the stones TCMeyer has broken in for himself because our techniques differ.  I believe a stone broke mechanically would feel like a worn out stone to me.

    It is akin to buying a used car.  I want it from new and I want to break it or break it in how I see fit.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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    #42552
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 1932

    Just to be clear, I’ve only used the glass media once – in the case of the longitudinal cluster.  I think that a break-in procedure using glass might be a workable method, but would need to be tested by someone who had a lot of new stones they could afford to throw away, or were willing to put at risk.  I believe that a result might be that some low number of strokes on glass would work as well as 10 to 20 knives.  I don’t know if that number is 10 or 50.  Maybe Clay could try that out while checking the surface of the diamonds with his 2000X microscope.  The objective is to knock off all diamond particles not directly attached to the platen.  At what point is that accomplished?

    I am thinking that WE’s supplier has been improving their process, as the last set of stones I bought (400/600 and 800/1000) worked beautifully from the start.  Yes, they feel a lot coarser than my well-used stones, but there were none of the “clunks” I’ve felt in the past, when the first few sharpenings were really rough.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #42558
    Mark76
    Participant
    • Topics: 179
    • Replies: 2760

    I was wondering what you guys think about rubbing 2 handles of the same grit against each other to help break in and general consistency.

    No, dont’t. This will servely deteriotate the quality of the stones.

    Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

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