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Ceramics…What To Expect…

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  MarcH 01/08/2019 at 2:52 pm.

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  • #48835

    NorCalQ
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    • Topics: 32
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    I’ve used my 1200/1600 and 1.4/0.6 ceramics a few times now.  My first use was a big question mark for me.  They were very rough and left a very inconsistent scratch patter.  After that, I did some research here and found advise to rub like grits together to wear thru the factory glazing and flatten out the rough parts. I  did that and just by touch and site, the difference was apparent.

    After that, I’ve used the ceramics a few more times and found them to work very smoothly, as I would expect them too.  Using them after 1k grit, I found that the 1200 grit was already producing a shine or mirror finish.  Now I’m wondering if that is the way they are supposed to perform or should they be producing a visible Scatch pattern, like other grits before it?  In other words, did I overwork my ceramics together and take away their effectiveness?

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    #48934

    Lenny
    Participant
    • Topics: 5
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    My 1200 grit ceramics do not produce a “scratch” to my eye. Instead its more of a dull luster; these are obviously still scratches but I wanted to describe it in a way relevant to your question.

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    #48937

    NorCalQ
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    • Topics: 32
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    Lenny, that helps to hear.  I’ll look specifically for that, next time I use them.  Right now, I’m dealing with what to use, when.  From 1500, do I go with my 6/3 films, fine/superfine ceramics or 5/3.5 strops?  I guess I should use each one and record pics of each result, then compare.  That said, laziness and a drive for results keeps stopping me from actually doin that.  Sorry excuse, I know.

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    #48938

    Organic
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    • Topics: 17
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    Strops work differently than the stones and films. Stones and lapping films remove a lot more material and will refine the apex much faster. Strops are more for smoothing out the bevels, improving polish, and removing any remaining burr. The choice of exactly what progression to use is a matter of personal preference and intended cutting application for the blade.

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    #48940

    Lenny
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    • Topics: 5
    • Replies: 22

    Yes, Organic is correct, play around with it. The diamond stones are the foundation of any sharpening progression I use on the WE. From there, I will proceed with lapping films, ceramics, or more straight to strops. I do not use the lapping films and ceramics together and no do I use strops after my lapping films because I finish with a 1 micron film and feel the edge I get from that is what I want for that application.

    I would recommend on finding progressions that give you a good return on time and materials invested, the latter being mostly a concern with lapping films since they are expensive.

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    #48953

    Organic
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    • Topics: 17
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    If you want a closeup view at the bevels that the ceramic stones produce, check out this old thread. It was a good one and has some very cool microscope images from Clay.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by  Organic.
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    #48964

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 58
    • Replies: 1855

    If you want a closeup view at the bevels that the ceramic stones produce, check out this old thread. It was a good one and has some very cool microscope images from Clay.

    This linked thread in Organics quote is a very long, (10 pages in all), and thorough discussion including high powered microscopic examinations and photographs, done by Clay, of different mediums and grits and their resulting scratch patterns.  This should help enlighten you so you can hopefully find it easier to make your own informed decisions which medium and which order to use them in, to achieve your ideal sharpening/polishing progression.

    It is well worth saving as a “favorite” to revisit it and reread it at your leisure.  It was a tremendous, time consuming, effort and contribution made by Clay, the owner and creator of Wicked Edge.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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