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Ceramics 1200/1600 & .6/1.4 mu: where do these fall?

Recent Forums Main Forum Techniques and Sharpening Strategies Abrasives Ceramics 1200/1600 & .6/1.4 mu: where do these fall?

This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Expidia 03/13/2018 at 6:28 am.

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  • #45484

    Expidia
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    • Topics: 28
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    Currently, I’m using (sometimes 50/80) but mostly 100 through 1500 on the diamond stones followed by 6 mu DLF, 3 mu and 1 mu then stropping with 3.5/5 emulsions on the leather strops.

    So in the grand scheme of things where would I work in the ceramics every few knifes which I bought already as I’d like to break them in while Im practicing from knife to knife.

    Do I use the ceramics after the 1500 in place of the DLF progression and then end with the strops?

    I’m happy with the results I’m getting using the stones and DLF’s, but I’d like to rotate the ceramics into my sharpening sessions from time to time so I can brake in all my abrasives while I’m gaining experience.  What steps or abrasives can I eliminate when using the ceramics?

    Thx

    #45485

    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 52
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    Read this Forum thread, if you haven’t already.  In particular sksharp’s post #45452 from 3/11.  He shares some insight on the ceramics.  They take a long time to break in before do they’re best work.

    There’s lots of Posts from others, on their experiences, you’ll have to search it out and read up on the ceramics.  They’re a lot of thoughts and theories where they best fit in the scheme of the progression.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

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    #45493

    Expidia
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    • Topics: 28
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    Read this Forum thread, if you haven’t already. In particular sksharp’s post #45452 from 3/11. He shares some insight on the ceramics. They take a long time to break in before do they’re best work. There’s lots of Posts from others, on their experiences, you’ll have to search it out and read up on the ceramics. They’re a lot of thoughts and theories where they best fit in the scheme of the progression.

    Wow, thx Marc for your link to that ceramic comment of SK’s lit a bulb in my head . . . I don’t need ceramics at this point.  His 200-300 passes with his ceramics made me think that I don’t need arms like popeye’s and for $120 for the .6/1.4 ceramic and $90 for the 1200/1600 ceramic thats $210 (minus $9 return shipping as it was not the vendors error).   So I just printed the return labels for the ceramics that I don’t really need (I’m sure I could by them used in the future).  One set of the ceramics has not even been delivered yet.  When it comes I’ll just slap the label on and send it back.

    So my credit will be $201 and the cost of the vice upgrade ordered last night was $230.  Now because of your pointing me to the link . . . the $230 vice upgrade is technically only costing me $29 😎.   You are certainly worth your weight in sluffed off diamond particles.  Thanks again.

     

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    #45504

    Organic
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    I recently purchased the 1.4 micron / 0.6 micron ceramics. Like you, I already have up to the 1500 grit diamonds and they give great results. I use the ceramic stones after the whole progression of diamonds. I have only used them on 2 knives thus far, but I like what they do and think they will become a regular part of my sharpening progression. There are several things about the them that make these stones a useful addition to the collection:

    1.) They cut in a very different manner to the diamond stones and work well to eradicate any remaining scratch pattern left. The scratches the ceramic stones impart seems to be a little more random in nature (not like the neatly aligned marks left by the diamonds) and the scratches seem to be much more shallow.

    2.) The edge that the ceramic stones leave seems to have more tooth to it than the higher grit diamond stones do. The 0.6 micron works well for a micro bevel because of this characteristic.

    3.) The 0.6 micron leaves a nearly mirrored finish with sufficient strokes. This shines up very well with some stropping to give a beautiful mirrored edge.

    These stones do take a lot of strokes to work their magic, but I sharpen for fun so that’s not a huge negative in my book. There is no doubt that the diamond lapping films bring out more shine and do so in about 1/10th of the time. I have those too and like what they do also. The bottom line is that I like having options.

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    #45508

    Expidia
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    Thanks for that insight organic.  Im sure I’ll buy them again at some future dat, but rather than putting in a lot of strokes Id prefer to spend that extea time profiling some of my other knives to gain more experience.  Ill probably pick a set up again when i see them used and probably broken in some.

    I bought 2-sheets each of self adhesive DLF from Nanolap technologies. Each sheet is $15 and after cutting into strips the sheets yielded 108 strips which with shipping comes out the 93 cents each and they should last me a long time. I ordered 2 sheets of  6mu, 2 of 3mu and 2 of 1mu.

    Im sure Ill come across some used ceramics at some point to add to my abrasive assortment.  Thx again for your sharpening strategy with your ceramics.

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    #45512

    Expidia
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    • Topics: 28
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    This was also good thread started 3 months ago in the abrasive thread category asking a similar question that I asked.  I missed it due to how it was titled. When I think of stones I think diamonds, not ceramic materials. Right or wrong I’m still just learning here.  I did not think ceramics was discussed in the thread I linked to below, but it also answers my original question as do some of the response above do too.
    It was discussing ceramics vs diamonds suggesting especially for new users its probably better to stay with diamond abrasives in your early stages as ceramics are not only of higher cost, they take so long to break in properly.

    Efficient Stone selection

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by  Expidia.
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