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Bevel Angle Change Question…

Recent Forums Main Forum Getting Started Bevel Angle Change Question…

This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Expidia 01/28/2019 at 6:15 am.

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  • #49074

    NorCalQ
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    • Topics: 32
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    I just changed the bevel angle on a cleaver with the WE and it took quite some time with the 100 stones.  Is it ok or even advisable to use a Tormek or equivalent to change the bevel angle, then proceed to the WE?  Will the slight hollow grind be just as hard to remove as changing the bevel angel?

    #49075

    Hogdog
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    I use my Tormek to profile and finish on my WE all the time. The hollow bevel from the Tormek is so insignificant that I’ve not seen an issue.

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    #49079

    NorCalQ
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    • Topics: 32
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    Hogdog, thanks.  Just what I needed to know.  It’s a bit of a pain to haul out the “Tank”, as I call it, but as I suspected and you confirm, it should save me some time and effort and the cost of buying more stones.  I knew the hollow grind was very shallow, however I wasn’t sure if it might cause another issue for the WE.  Thanks.

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    #49124

    NorCalQ
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    Well, I used the Tormek to get a 20* hollow ground bevel on this thrift store knife.  It took about 2 passes per side, to establish the new bevel and go from super dull, to burrs on both sides.  From there, I went straight to the WE and set it to 20 dps.  I blacked the bevel, took a swipe with 800 grit and it turned out to be a near perfect degree match, with only a very slight amount of hollow.  I started with the 400 grit stones and wiped out the black after just a few strokes.  Boy, did that save me a ton of strokes.  I just have to get over the trouble of taking out the Tormek and setting it up.  Here’s a pic of the hair-splitting finished edge…

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    #49132

    tcmeyer
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    Anytime you face a situation where there’s a lot of steel to remove, do not hesitate to take the mindset that doing so one stroke at a time is simply not reasonable.  Any of the driven systems, whether a WorkSharp, a Tormek, a bench grinder or one of the belt sanders will save you hours and hours of tedious work as well as unnecessary wear on your diamonds.  Pick a system you think will do the best job at profiling at your target angle and go with it.  Your WE won’t care how the starting bevel got there; it’ll simply do what it does best – finish the bevel with a precision, wicked edge.

    Cleavers, at least those I’ve worked on, have extremely heavy bevel shoulders, with bevels five to ten times as wide as the typical kitchen/cook’s knives.  This translates into very large amounts of steel to be removed, even in touch-ups if you find a significant nick in the edge.

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    #49133

    NorCalQ
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    • Topics: 32
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    Thanks for the advice and it is well taken.  I was a little hesitant with the hollow grind, but now I see it’s no problem.  I expect I’ll be using the Tormek for that purpose, rather than buying the coarser stones.

    I see why folks would use the Tormek for all of their sharpening, if for nothing else but the speed.  I’m sure the properly ground and stropped edge would be plenty sharp for lots of folks.  That said, when you see the results of the WE edge, it’s night and day.

    #49134

    Organic
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    • Topics: 17
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    Do you have the Tormek 4000 grit Japanese style stone?

    #49135

    NorCalQ
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    • Topics: 32
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    No I don’t.  If I could have gotten the Tormek to work to my satisfaction, considering the limitations of the original stone, then I was going to purchase more stones for more refined edges.  As it was, “polishing” the one wheel to a 1k grit, then stropping, never gave me the consistent, refined edge I wanted.  Even if you stopped your WE sharpening at 1k stones, then stropped, it would be a far better edge than that of the Tormek.

    So, in answer to your question, I chose not to go with higher grade Tormek stones and opted to put the $ into my WE, which I am loving, the more I use it.

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    #49144

    NorCalQ
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    Ok…just because…I went back and hit the edge with 6 and 3 micron films, then stropped again.  It really did improve the scratches.  Don’t know if you can tell by my poor pics, but take a look…

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    #49203

    Expidia
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    For those of you that can’t afford or want to lug out a secondary sharpening system or have room for grinders etc . . .

    I find the WE 50/80 stone set is a Godsend and a huge time-saver when reprofiling for removing metal fast especially on beater type knifes.  Just use light pressure so as not to impart deeper scratches.  I find the next stone set 100/200 removes the scratches quickly that the 50/80 leaves behind.  When I get tired of too many strokes especially on the harder steels I whip out those 50/80’s and I’m off to the races!

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