Advanced Search

Best edge for the job??

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #34812
    Steve
    Participant
    • Topics: 21
    • Replies: 44

    <p style=”text-align: center;”>Hi guys,</p>
    Ive had the Wicked edge for a couple ofyear’s and love it.

    Thing is I can never really figure out what it the best edge to settle on.  I love sharpening them like a mirror finish and slashing phone book paper andshavings sharp with it etc, but these edges don’t seem to last long.

    My main purpose is to skin rabbits, pheasants and duck etc.   I have tried and really toothy finish also like a 400 grit finish.

    What in your opinion from you more experienced guys think is the best angle edge and finsh for my spyderco Endura 4 for my needs.

    I want a very sharp knife but I want it to last and not go blunt after a couple of rabbit’s etc.

     

    And advise guys

     

    Steve

    #34813
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 1941

    I can’t really say with authority which edge will last under the specific use you have, but I can share what and why I use as an edge on my frequently-used blades and what I’d start out with.

    I have a lot of EDC folders, so to remove doubt or confusion, I settled on a 20 dps edge at 1000 grit for all my folders.  To further simplify the sharpening process, I mount all my folding knives the same way – high key position with the bolster or thumb screw set forward against the vise.  For my Spyderco FFG’s, I line the forward edge of the thumb hole with the face of the vise.The only knives I differ from this is where there is a specific reason.  In these cases, I record the angle and grits for future reference.

    I’ve found that the durability of an edge is tied to the hardness of the blade.  My Spydie ZDP’s don’t show the same type of wear as my other blades and I’ve seen more “chips” in their edges when I tried angles lower than 20 dps.    In my experience, the dulling of softer blades is largely due to dents caused by pressing the edge against bones or something else hard.  Higher angles will help, but not all that much.  The ZDP’s (which are hardened to RC64-65) don’t show dents like that – the wear is more uniform along the length of the blade.

    If you’re boning your bunnies, or if you’re doing some delicate skinning, I’d try some higher angles – maybe as much as 25 dps.  If you like the toothy edges, try the 600’s and 800’s.  I’ve read a number of guys on the ‘net saying how happy they were with 600 grit edges.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #34815
    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 929

    If you’re looking for an edge that has similar slicing ability to a blade with an acute angle with more edge retention ability, try adding a micro-bevel. A lot of people seem to like a mirror polished primary bevel with a slightly more obtuse (usually like 2-5 degrees) micro-bevel at 800 or 1000 grit.

    3 users thanked author for this post.
    #34817
    Steve
    Participant
    • Topics: 21
    • Replies: 44

    If you’re looking for an edge that has similar slicing ability to a blade with an acute angle with more edge retention ability, try adding a micro-bevel. A lot of people seem to like a mirror polished primary bevel with a slightly more obtuse (usually like 2-5 degrees) micro-bevel at 800 or 1000 grit.

     

    Cheers thanks for that mate.  Have you got any info or a like i can look up bevels, primary and secondary etc, im not to familiar with which one is which lol

    Cheers again guys

     

     

    Steve

    #34821
    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 37
    • Replies: 1941

    Organic is referring to a method of achieving a thin edge (use a rather low angle for the main bevel) and then making it more resistant to dings and chips by making a very few passes at the apex with a higher setting.  For instance, for some of my kitchen knives, I sharpen and polish to a 17 dps edge, then take maybe three very light strokes on each side with my 1000 grit stones set at 20 dps.  The resulting microbevel is almost invisible to the unaided eye, but the overall performance is improved.  You get the low cutting resistance of the polished 17 dps bevels, but the chip resistance and toothiness of the 20 dps 1000 grit apex.

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #34823
    Steve
    Participant
    • Topics: 21
    • Replies: 44

    Organic is referring to a method of achieving a thin edge (use a rather low angle for the main bevel) and then making it more resistant to dings and chips by making a very few passes at the apex with a higher setting. For instance, for some of my kitchen knives, I sharpen and polish to a 17 dps edge, then take maybe three very light strokes on each side with my 1000 grit stones set at 20 dps. The resulting microbevel is almost invisible to the unaided eye, but the overall performance is improved. You get the low cutting resistance of the polished 17 dps bevels, but the chip resistance and toothiness of the 20 dps 1000 grit apex.

     

    Cheers thanks for that matey, I get what you are saying.  I actually watched a youtube video clip yesterday with Clay, he did very similar to what you suggested, he done the primary bevel at at 15 dps to a stropped finish and then he changed the angle to 20 dps and gave a couple of passes with the 200 grit stones to gain the toothy edge.

    Ill have a play around guys, any other advise would be greatly appreciated thanks fellas.

     

     

    Steve

     

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #34853
    wickededge
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 122
    • Replies: 2933

    Steve,

    This is great advice from everyone. I’ve had a lot of success in prepping my hunting knives by finishing with 1000# diamonds and then doing a little stropping with the 5/3.5 set. Normally I lower the angle when I go to strop, but for the hunting knives, I keep it the same as the sharpening angle. That gives a very tiny, convex micro-bevel which seems to be very durable.

    -Clay

    4 users thanked author for this post.
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.