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Another Pennsyltucky Knife Nut!

Recent Forums Main Forum Welcome Mat Another Pennsyltucky Knife Nut!

This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  airscapes 06/19/2019 at 7:34 pm.

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  • #50716

    Clayton
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 0

    Good morning folks! I purchased a WE GO shortly after Christmas this year with some holiday funds and quickly added the 800/1000 stones and 3/5 micron strops. I’ve had a pretty good time learning the system and have been getting better at maintaining a consistent edge height per side based largely upon a lot of reading that I’ve found here – thanks for the knowledge contributed by others!

    Just joining up to contribute and ask questions when/if they come to me. Have a great one folks!

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #50718

    Organic
    Participant
    • Topics: 17
    • Replies: 838

    Welcome Clayton!

    #50727

    tcmeyer
    Participant
    • Topics: 33
    • Replies: 1808

    Welcome aboard Clayton!

    Pennsyltucky?  Is that like Michiana?  I’m a Cheesehead, and I’ve never heard anyone saying they’re from Wisconois, but maybe that’s because of the Packer/Bear thingy. 😉

    A little later, I looked at a map and there’s no contiguous border between PA and KY.  So maybe it’s a “by marriage” kind of thing?

     

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  tcmeyer.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  tcmeyer.
    #50741

    airscapes
    Participant
    • Topics: 9
    • Replies: 164

    I googled it..

    Pennsyltucky is a slang portmanteau of the state names Pennsylvania and Kentucky. It is used to characterize—usually humorously, but sometimes deprecatingly—the rural part of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania outside the Pittsburgh and Philadelphia metropolitan areas, (Including Harrisburg–Carlisle metropolitan statistical area) more specifically applied to the local people and culture of its mountainous central Appalachian region. The term is used more generally to refer to the Appalachian region, particularly its central core, which runs from Pennsylvania to Kentucky, and its people.

    Welcome Clayton!  Where abouts you from?

     

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  airscapes.
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