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A new youtube video

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Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #54388
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2102

    If you feel it’s prudent to always wear a dust mask, while you are sharpening, I wouldn’t argue that point.  Better safe then sorry.

    I measure the angle after I match it as determined by removing the sharpie ink, so I know what this bevel angle actually is.  Then I can record that angle in my sharpening log, along with the knives positions determined from using an alignment guide.  Then I have this logged data to use to position knives later when doing edge touch-ups.

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    #54389
    jabas2000
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 31

    I thought that we were not supposed to check angles with a coarse stone? And I advise you guys to wear a N95 mask when you are sharpening knives with any system. It is the particles and dust that you do not see, that you breathe in…IMHO

    Before sharpening I determine the angle with the catra hobbygoni. That will be my guideline. The sharpy test is only to 
    check if the knife is in the right place in the clamp.

     

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 5 days ago by jabas2000.
    #54391
    000Robert
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 41

    Oh, ok. I can’t wait till I get one of those. They have a cheaper one on Amazon but I would rather save the money and get a good one.

    #54392
    MarcH
    Moderator
    • Topics: 59
    • Replies: 2102

    000Robert, when I’m finding the “sweet spot”, (i.e., the best or most efficient position to clamp the knife for sharpening), using a sharpie, I use a very fine stone or often even lapping films, with a very wide or obtuse stone angle setting.  All I’m trying to do is remove the sharpie ink, just barely touching the edge with the stone, without removing any steel, while adjusting the clamping position.  I’m simply determining how efficiently the stone contacts the knife’s edge apex as it’s positioned and clamped.

    Once I have the knife positioned and clamped in this best position, then I start adjusting the stone angles, more acutely, to determine what the angle actually is, as I remove the sharpie ink from across the entire bevel height.  Then last, I measure and record the stone angles where I get complete removal of the sharpie ink from the full bevel, shoulder to apex.

    For me it’s a multistep, multipurpose process.

    (My issue with the hobbygoni is, I sharpen mostly chef’s knives.  These knives can often be too tall to fit in the circular frame of the goniometer.  IMO, just measuring the bevel angle at the shorter height of the knife’s tip, (the only knife portion that would fit in the device),  is not a true representation of the actual knife’s bevel angle and therefore an expensive device for limited use.  I find many knives as they’re forged, have a narrow bevel angled tip where the steel is often thinner, also).

    Marc
    (MarcH's Rack-It)

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #54393
    000Robert
    Participant
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 41

    That’s pretty much the way the knowledge base helps say to do it rather than grinding your blade with a coarse stone not knowing where it is going to grind your blade at. I would rather put a gentle scratch on my edge while removing the sharpie ink to find the right angle than gouging a 100 grit scratch across it.

    The hobbygoni is a quick and easy way to get an idea of about what a blades edges are. At home I would just clamp it up and see.

    #54407
    Larry Hargraves
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 2

    Nice video! Its always satisfying to sharpen a dull knife. I once bought an old cheap knife from a thrift store. The handle was beautifully carved so I did my best to sharpen the blade. Ive been using the knife every time I go on a fishing trip.

    #54408
    jabas2000
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 31

    000Robert, when I’m finding the “sweet spot”, (i.e., the best or most efficient position to clamp the knife for sharpening), using a sharpie, I use a very fine stone or often even lapping films, with a very wide or obtuse stone angle setting. All I’m trying to do is remove the sharpie ink, just barely touching the edge with the stone, without removing any steel, while adjusting the clamping position. I’m simply determining how efficiently the stone contacts the knife’s edge apex as it’s positioned and clamped.

    Once I have the knife positioned and clamped in this best position, then I start adjusting the stone angles, more acutely, to determine what the angle actually is, as I remove the sharpie ink from across the entire bevel height. Then last, I measure and record the stone angles where I get complete removal of the sharpie ink from the full bevel, shoulder to apex. For me it’s a multistep, multipurpose process. (My issue with the hobbygoni is, I sharpen mostly chef’s knives. These knives can often be too tall to fit in the circular frame of the goniometer. IMO, just measuring the bevel angle at the shorter height of the knife’s tip, (the only knife portion that would fit in the device), is not a true representation of the actual knife’s bevel angle and therefore an expensive device for limited use. I find many knives as they’re forged, have a narrow bevel angled tip where the steel is often thinner, also).

     

    MarcH Maybe this one is something for your knives: https://sharpeningtool.eu/de/catalog/accessories

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #54410
    Brewbear
    Participant
    • Topics: 7
    • Replies: 133

    Very interesting and a useful tool to be sure, but a bit overkill in my case. There are only a handful of angles I sharpen at (13, 17 and 20) and that I already have noted for each knife. If a new blade happens along, sharpies work OK and I generally like to keep it simple. Just my 2 cents.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
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