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What's the most important thing you've learned (about sharpening with the WE?)

Recent Forums Main Forum Welcome Mat What's the most important thing you've learned (about sharpening with the WE?)

This topic contains 22 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  sksharp 08/19/2017 at 5:53 am.

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #40517

    Nick Middleton
    Participant

      I would say this YouTube Video posted by Curry Custom Cutlery made me completely rethink where I mount my knives in the vice.

      I was wasting a lot of time having to change my motion, or make extra strokes in sections to correct the bevel.  I didn’t realize I was compensating for not having the knife if the best location and not being able to get an even-bevel on horizontal swipes. I had to use extra vertical-stokes to grind the areas not getting the same attention! I was getting even heel & tip; but not heel, tip, & belly!  I made a cardboard template like his to help with determining the best spot on a knife that and it removes the guess-work. I didn’t not have a good grasp of the effect of edge-height and belly-curvature.

       

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      #40569

      sksharp
      Participant

        That is a very good video Nick! I have to add to my prior post, recording the placement of the knife in the clamp with the adv. alignment guide is something that I’ve done from the start and glad I did. Repeatability is one of the major advantages of the WE.

        1 user thanked author for this post.
        #40571

        Mark76
        Keymaster

          Yup, indeed a very good video that not only explains things, but also gives practical advice. Looking forward to the advanced alighnment guide.

          Molecule Polishing: my blog about sharpening with the Wicked Edge

          2 users thanked author for this post.
          #40616

          cjb80202
          Participant

            Don’t push/press the stone against the blade; let the weight of the stone be all the pressure you need.

            In aviation it’s called trying to squeeze the black out of the stick; the tendency of new pilots to squeeze like hell. I had the same tendency in my early sharpenings – to really squeeze the stone and to grind the blade way too hard.

            4 users thanked author for this post.
            #40734

            tacocat
            Participant

              I am taking the advice of many and stocking up on old kitchen knives while I wait for my Wicked Edge GO to arrive. The local thrift store has these knives priced at .35 each. There are some that could make a great knife but none that I plan on keeping.

              Andy

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              3 users thanked author for this post.
              #40737

              MarcH
              Moderator

                Looks like my grandmothers drawer when I was a kid, lol.  No disrespect intended…that’s nostalgia.  I’m sure some are WWII era and maybe even Depression Era.  If they could only tell stories!

                Marc

                1 user thanked author for this post.
                #40739

                cjb80202
                Participant

                  I’ll bet you’ll want to keep at least a couple after you sharpen them. We have an 8-inch kitchen knife that we’ve always had, meaning I don’t even remember when/where it came from. I’ve always used it as the birthday cake knife because that’s all it would cut.

                  I put it on my WE100 and holy schmoly is it sharp now! I’ve used it for about 4 weeks since, and it is staying really sharp. I’ve even bought a cover for it now for keeping it in the drawer, because now it’s actually a threat to cut fingers.

                  1 user thanked author for this post.
                  #40744

                  sksharp
                  Participant

                    Yea man! I have never thrown a knife away. After getting my WE PP3 those old knives became invaluable and largely responsible for me learning, that and asking everyone I knew for some of their knives but be careful with that because once you do a couple for them they’ll want the rest done. LOL Some of those knives are in my kitchen now and work very well.

                    Those knives are in my grandmother’s drawer MarcH! LOL

                    The light touch is a very good tip Chris. I’m always concerned with pressure and technique now where I really wasn’t as much when I started.

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